Iraq War: Live Television Coverage Brings Home Horrors of Conflict to American Public

The News Letter (Belfast, Northern Ireland), March 26, 2003 | Go to article overview

Iraq War: Live Television Coverage Brings Home Horrors of Conflict to American Public


Byline: BILLY KENNEDY

AIRPORTS are generally the hub of life in the United States. There the pulse of the America nation reverberates as millions of commuters move from city to city and state to state.

It is in the spacious airport lounges, where people have a bit more time on their hands in between connecting flights, that interest in the war in Iraq is at its most intense.

This is what I found when I arrived in Cincinnati Airport, Ohio, from Gatwick, London, on Monday en-route to Knoxville, Tennessee.

As hundreds crowded around television monitors, hardly a word was spoken.

They were glued to the round-the-clock CNN news bulletins, relayed with up-to-date precision, and much detail, all the way from Basra to Baghdad.

This scene is repeated at airports across America - instant communication from around the world is one of great inventions of our technological era - and the Americans, even in the middle states, are certainly up to speed.

When I arrived at Knoxville Airport the couch potato brigade appeared to have literally transferred themselves into prime seats in front of the television monitor, almost oblivious to their pressing schedules.

American President George W Bush still enjoys substantial support for the war but there is a nervousness and an apprehension. …

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