Stem Cell Hope for Knee Ops; Research Could Help Sports Stars Dogged by Cartilage Injuries

Western Mail (Cardiff, Wales), March 27, 2003 | Go to article overview

Stem Cell Hope for Knee Ops; Research Could Help Sports Stars Dogged by Cartilage Injuries


CUTTING-EDGE stem cell technology being explored in Wales could revolutionise knee surgery, ending the injury misery for the nation's sporting elite.

Work being carried out at Cardiff University aims to determine whether implanted stem cells can repair damaged cartilage.

Although still in the early research stages, if it proves successful the technology could have major implications for the treatment of cartilage injuries and could even reduce the need for complex knee replacement operations.

It is also hoped that the development of effective stem cell technology could reduce the incidence and pain of osteoarthritis in later life.

The research is part of the first wave of work being carried out around the world into the application of stem cells which, many scientists believe, is the future of modern medicine.

Backed by a pounds 90,000 Arthritis Research Fund grant, it follows on from previous research in Wales which identified the presence of stem cells, or similar progenitor cells, on the surface of cartilage.

Stem cells have the ability to transform themselves into any other cell in the human body and progenitor cells should, theoretically, be able to give rise to other cells of that tissue type.

The hope is if these cells can be implanted into damaged cartilage, new high-quality cartilage will grow at the injury site, healing the trauma. Post-doctoral research associate Dr Sam Webster, who is collaborating with Dr Sam Evans at Cardiff University and Dr Anwyn Williams at the University of Wales College of Medicine, said, ``If you damage the cartilage in a sporting injury a surgeon will use keyhole technology to cut away the surface of the cartilage and wash it out with saline solution.

``This can sometimes encourage the cartilage to re-grow but it won't be true cartilage and patients can end up having future joint problems or even need the joint replacing.

``This is the problem with most cartilage repair strategies - they don't last long. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Stem Cell Hope for Knee Ops; Research Could Help Sports Stars Dogged by Cartilage Injuries
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.