Survival of Rain Forest Essential to Our Survival

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), March 26, 2003 | Go to article overview

Survival of Rain Forest Essential to Our Survival


Byline: J. Hope Babowice

You wanted to know

Nathan Roys, 10, of Mundelein wanted to know:

If we cut down all the rain forests, how would that affect us?

If you have a question you'd like Kids Ink to answer, write Kids Ink, care of the Daily Herald, 50 Lakeview Parkway, Suite 104, Vernon Hills, IL 60061 or send an e-mail to lake@@dailyherald.com. Along with the question, include your name, age, phone number, hometown, grade and school.

For more information

To learn more about the rainforest, the Grayslake Public Library suggests the following.

- Video: "Rainforest for Children" series of three tapes: Plants, Animals, People.

- "The Most Beautiful Roof in the World" by Kathryn Lasky.

- "Secrets of the Rainforest" series by Michael Chinery: Partners and Parents, Plants and Planteaters, Poisoners and Pretenders, Predators and Prey, People and Places and Resources and Conservation.

- "Journey into the Rainforest" by Tim Knight.

- "Nature Unfolds. Gerard Cheshire" by Richard Orr, also illustrator of "The Tropical Rainforest."

- "City of Beasts" Isabelle Allende (fiction).

On the Web

See Fauna & Flora International Web site at www.fauna-flora.org.

Nathan Roys, 10, a fourth-grader at Mundelein's Diamond Lake School, asked: "If we cut down all the rain forests, how would that affect us?"

"Cutting down all of our rain forests would be a catastrophe," said Sara Brown Riggs of the Rainforest Action Network in California.

Lisa Hootman of the Morton Arboretum in Lisle said: "It would affect biodiversity and cause huge erosion problems."

Rain forests are complex ecosystems at the equator that cover 2 percent of the Earth's surface, yet house more than half the Earth's plant and animal species. The largest rain forests are in Brazil, the Democratic Republic of Congo and Indonesia.

What makes a rain forest? Diversity and climate. An estimated 5 to 10 million species of animals, plants and insects thrive in the rain forest. Rainfall ranges from 160 to 300 inches each year and the temperature hovers between 75 and 80 degrees Fahrenheit.

Here's how the rain forest works. A dense thicket of trees, vines, shrubs and other plants rise to 160 feet in areas that span hundreds and hundreds of miles. Hidden within are four layers of plant and animal life - the forest floor, the understory, the canopy and the emergent layer. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Survival of Rain Forest Essential to Our Survival
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.