Federal Agencies to Dismantle Contract Bundling: President Demands Reform Aimed at Boosting Competition among Small Businesses. (Small Business News)

By Jones, Joyce | Black Enterprise, April 2003 | Go to article overview

Federal Agencies to Dismantle Contract Bundling: President Demands Reform Aimed at Boosting Competition among Small Businesses. (Small Business News)


Jones, Joyce, Black Enterprise


For several years, small and minority-owned businesses have struggled to get their fair share of the federal procurement pie.

One of the biggest obstacles is contract bundling, which combines several smaller contracts into one huge package too big for small and minority-owned companies to handle. In a decade-long, David-and-Goliath struggle, these companies are receiving fewer and fewer contracting opportunities. But that may all change by year's end.

In response to a request by President George W. Bush, the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) issued a directive to federal agencies in October 2002, ordering them to reverse the bundling trend and to boost competition among small businesses. Agencies were given a Jan. 31 deadline to submit status reports on bundled contracts.

Contract bundling costs small businesses $13 billion in federal contracts in fiscal 2001 (the most recent data available), according to the Small Business Administration's Office of Advocacy. Contract bundling became popular after the federal government streamlined its acquisition procedures in the mid-1990s, reducing the number of procurement officers. To make their jobs easier, procurement officers combined previously separate contracts into larger deals, locking out the smaller players.

According to Angela Styles, administrator of OMB'S Office of Federal Procurement Policy, the plan has three important elements. The first holds senior management accountable for eliminating unnecessary contract bundling and mitigating the effects of necessary and justified bundling. "There are a lot of laws on the books right now dealing with bundling? says Styles. "The problem is they haven't been implemented at the agencies, so that takes a commitment from the political leadership to follow the laws and make sure they're properly implemented."

The second element is designed to monitor the status of agency efforts through timely and accurate reporting of contract bundling by members of the president's management council--deputy secretaries and administrators from the 26 major executive branch departments and agencies. …

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Federal Agencies to Dismantle Contract Bundling: President Demands Reform Aimed at Boosting Competition among Small Businesses. (Small Business News)
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