Southern Louisiana Residents Question Search for Killer; Man Linked to Deaths of Five Women

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), April 6, 2003 | Go to article overview

Southern Louisiana Residents Question Search for Killer; Man Linked to Deaths of Five Women


Byline: Hugh Aynesworth, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

BATON ROUGE, La. - There is a serial killer out there somewhere in this area of southern Louisiana, and residents are growing increasingly fearful and anxious as a law-enforcement strike force seems no closer to finding the killer.

Five dead women have been linked through DNA to the serial killer since September 2001. Many area men have been tested, but no matches have been made.

Confusing the issue more, the strike force leading the investigation, the Multi-Agency Homicide Task Force, has recently acknowledged that although it first leaned toward believing that the killer is a white man, it is not sure.

"Investigators are asking the community to broaden their thinking about the offender and consider that this person could possibly be a dark-complected white man, a man of mixed heritage or a black male," a March 21 news release said.

The composite drawing of an unidentified white male released by the task force and described as a "person of interest" in December has never been a suspect, the news release stated.

Baton Rouge Police Chief Pat Englade was asked heated questions at a rally on the Louisiana State University campus last Wednesday night. He tried to assure those present that the several agencies involved in the search are working hard behind the scenes.

"There are a tremendous amount of operations going on in and around the LSU campus," said Chief Englade, adding, "I'm sorry I can't be more specific."

But he vowed that "there is nothing we won't do to solve this case."

The police chief said the agencies have followed at least 30,000 leads so far.

"How can it hurt your investigation to better inform the public?" one woman asked Chief Englade. "You've said all along that this case will be solved with the public's help."

"I'd say we've given out more information than we maybe should have," the police chief replied. He was referring to statements made about shoe prints found at one crime scene and the much-publicized description of a white Chevrolet truck.

"We took a risk," the chief said, "when we put that out that he would dispose of those shoes.

"Do you think he was still driving that truck after we said that?"

The victims connected to the killer include Gina Green, 41, found strangled in her Baton Rouge home Sept. 24, 2001; Charlotte Murray Pace, 22, stabbed to death in her home near the LSU campus May 31; Pam Kinamore, 44, abducted from her home and found dead two days later, July 16 in a wooded area called Whiskey Bay; Dene Colomb, 23, of Lafayette, found beaten to death in a wooded area near Scott Nov. …

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