Partners for Stability: NATO Support for UN Peace Missions

By Jaap de Hoop Scheffer | Hampton Roads International Security Quarterly, January 15, 2005 | Go to article overview

Partners for Stability: NATO Support for UN Peace Missions


Jaap de Hoop Scheffer, Hampton Roads International Security Quarterly


As an Alliance of 26 democracies, NATO Allies are bound together by common values as well a commitment to common defense. In the past decade, NATO nations have expanded the geographic scope of Alliance operations and activities and transformed their nature, all without forgetting our core task of collective defense.

Each operation requires a political decision by Allied nations to commit their young men and women to a potentially hazardous mission. Such a grave step is never taken without extensive consultations among Allies. In response to a series of new strategic challenges, the Alliance has decided to go "out of area" to build stability in a number of regions that have an impact on the security of the Euro- Atlantic area.

The United Nations has also faced a multiplication of its activities and tasks in this fluid strategic environment. It is therefore not surprising that NATO and the United Nations, each within their specific roles, have found an increasing scope for cooperation, especially in peace operations.

This brings me to Bosnia and Herzegovina, because in a real sense, the Alliance's transformation began in the Balkans. The Bosnia mission was undertaken in close cooperation with, and under a mandate from, the United Nations.

This decision to go "out of area" in the Balkans was a historical decision for the Alliance. It was NATO's first peacekeeping operation. But just as importantly, it represented the birth of UN- NATO cooperation.

Since 1992, NATO has provided continuous support to the United Nations in the Balkans. In 1995, some 65,000 troops deployed to Bosnia and Herzegovina, under a United Nations' mandate, to implement the military aspects of the Dayton Peace Agreement. United Nations and NATO cooperation has resulted in a safe and secure environment. State institutions have been established, human rights are now respected, and the country has been set on the path to integration into Euro-Atlantic and European structures. Today only 7,000 troops remain in the country -- a clear indication of the considerable progress that has been made. Progress which is also to a very large extent due to the relentless efforts and very hard work of the successive High Representatives for Bosnia Herzegovina, from Carl Bildt to Lord Ashdown.

Given our joint success in Bosnia and Herzegovina, it is not surprising that NATO support to the United Nations there has been viewed as a template to be applied to other demanding crises. This template involves close cooperation with other major international players, including the European Union and the Organisation for Security and Cooperation in Europe.

In a cooperative international effort, NATO contributed to successfully defusing the crisis in the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, paving the way for a lasting political settlement, in the framework of the Ohrid Agreement. And since 1999, under a United Nations' mandate, NATO has been involved in stabilising the situation in Kosovo. In October 2004, NATO-led troops provided security for the Parliamentary Assembly elections there. The good cooperation between KFOR and UNMIK [United Nations Interim Administration Mission in Kosovo] on the ground continues to be crucial for the stability of the province.

While there has been real progress, work remains to be done and the closely coordinated international effort must continue across the wider region. The termination of the Stabilisation Force mission and the handover of peacekeeping responsibilities to the European Union on 2 December 2004 does not mean that NATO's long-term commitment to the country has changed. NATO will retain a military presence in the country and has established a new headquarters in Sarajevo which will provide advice on defence reform and will remain engaged in bringing indicted war criminals to justice. Co-operation with the ICTY [International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia] is a key conditionality for further progress in NATO/ BiH relations, starting with membership of the PfP [Partnership for Peace] programme. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Partners for Stability: NATO Support for UN Peace Missions
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.