Fight 'World Opinion' Propaganda

By Blankley, Tony | Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, August 6, 2006 | Go to article overview

Fight 'World Opinion' Propaganda


Blankley, Tony, Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review


"The object of life is not to be on the side of the majority but to escape finding oneself in the ranks of the insane," said Marcus Aurelius, the Roman emperor and stoic philosopher.

It's an appealing thought, but there is something to say for being in the insane majority. After all, it is decidedly unpleasant to be opposed by an insane majority. You could ask Israel right at the moment -- or for that matter for the past 3,000 years.

Whether technically insane, or merely wrong, ignorant, weak, stupid or malicious, the majority of people around the world -- what we respectfully call "world opinion" -- are rarely right about much of anything. That, in a nutshell, is why the world is in the shape it is -- and always has been.

Even the world's most powerful and stubborn men have felt the need to pay their respects to world opinion -- unwise a thing as world opinion usually is. Even Adolf Hitler, with all his insane hate and contempt for mankind (plus the strongest military force in the world at the time), felt the need to call his unprovoked invasion of Poland a "counterattack" in a Reichstag speech.

Of course, there was no Polish attack to "counter." He carefully preceded that lie with headlines the previous week in the German press such as "Three German Passenger Planes Shot At By Poles." Once again, there were no Polish deprivations of Germans -- except in the Nazi headlines. (If you were watching CNN et al. last week, these headlines might seem vaguely familiar.)

But the lesson from all this is that as confident (or overconfident) as Hitler was at the time, he recognized that he could gain something by manipulating world opinion with propaganda. It is vital to understand that while world opinion may be just the random collective judgment of mankind -- it is usually not random, but rather, in part at least, a propaganda-manipulated opinion.

Currently, the United States and Israel find themselves confronting a world opinion that is being shaped and manipulated by unfriendly others and by the residue of historic malevolence. Thus the question arises: How should Israel and the United States respond to the growing negative world opinion concerning the current Hezbollah-Israeli war?

Naturally, the Europeans, the United Nations and the mainstream media -- the current majority in world opinion -- implore America and Israel to renounce Israel's and America's efforts at self- defense from the hostility of radical Islamist terror. …

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