WVU's Big-Play Receiver Piles Up TDs

By Starr, Rick | Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, September 24, 2006 | Go to article overview

WVU's Big-Play Receiver Piles Up TDs


Starr, Rick, Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review


GREENVILLE, N.C. -- West Virginia wide receiver Darius Reynaud is on a hot streak that started in last season's Sugar Bowl, and he shows no sign of slowing down.

Reynaud scored on a 60-yard screen pass from quarterback Pat White to give the Mountaineers a much-needed, two-touchdown cushion in Saturday's 27-10 non-conference victory over East Carolina.

It marked his seventh career receiving touchdown, second of the season and second in as many games. Reynaud caught a 5-yard touchdown pass against Maryland. He also scored a pair of touchdowns on a reception and a reverse in the opening quarter of West Virginia's 38-35 upset over Georgia.

"There's no doubt, when Darius gets the ball, he knows what to do with it," White said.

Against the Pirates, Reynaud finished with five catches for a career-high 110 yards. It was the most yards gained by a West Virginia receiver since the 2004 Boston College game.

"In a way, it kind of started last season in the Sugar Bowl, the kind of feeling I've got," Reynaud said. "East Carolina isn't a bad team. They came out to play defense against the No. 4 team in the country."

Pouring it on

West Virginia has outscored its first four opponents, 63-7, in the first quarter this season and, 166-47, over the course of the entire game. …

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