Job Sharing Often a Good Fit

By Olson, Thomas | Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, August 26, 2006 | Go to article overview

Job Sharing Often a Good Fit


Olson, Thomas, Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review


"If this is Tuesday, you must be Sharon."

Sharon Cercone gets comments like that at PNC Financial Services Group. The business compensation adviser alternates work days with another employee, Linda Gladziszewski, in an arrangement called "job sharing."

The practice of two people splitting one job has been adopted, or at least tried, by a number of companies in the past 20 years or so, say experts. Aside from PNC, local practitioners have included Verizon Communications Inc. and Mellon Financial Corp.

"When job-sharing is well-managed, it leads to better productivity, reduced turnover, reduced absenteeism and reduced overtime," said Kathleen D'Appolonia, the human resources senior vice president to whom Cercone and Gladziszewski report.

PNC's Cercone works on Mondays and Tuesdays, and alternates every other Wednesday with Gladziszewski, who works Thursdays and Fridays. The pair share an office, desk, telephone and computer. The women, who are vice presidents, also divide the job's pay, vacation time and other benefits.

"We're able to do more things at home that we couldn't do before, like attending school functions or volunteering at church," said Gladziszewski, 45, of Pine. "We can have the best of both worlds, plus contribute to the family income."

Cercone, 48, of Kennedy, engaged in her first job share in 1989 at Mellon after the birth of her son, Michael. Sharing the compensation consulting job was the idea of her supervisor at Mellon, which still offers the flexible-work option, said a Mellon spokesman.

Gladziszewski and Cercone met two years later and began sharing a recruiting job at Mellon until 1997. They departed for a human resources job-share at PNC in 2002.

"To the extent we help them better balance their work lives and their personal lives, they are able to perform better and provide better service for customers," said D'Appolonia. …

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