Best-Selling Author Fought Social Injustice

By Smith, Craig | Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, November 28, 2006 | Go to article overview

Best-Selling Author Fought Social Injustice


Smith, Craig, Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review


As a student at the University of Pittsburgh, Bebe Moore Campbell fought to add more black members to the faculty and to correct what she saw as social inequities.

"There was nobody more passionate about righting basic social injustices than Bebe," said Jack Daniel, a Pitt communications professor who first met Ms. Campbell when she was a student in an African-American rhetoric class he taught.

Thirty four years later, she would continue to fight for the school she loved, but as a member of the board of trustees.

Bebe Moore Campbell, 56, died Nov. 27, 2006, in Los Angeles, after a battle with brain cancer. She was diagnosed with the disease in February, said her publicist, Linda Wharton Boyd.

Born Feb. 18, 1950, in Philadelphia, Ms. Campbell graduated from Pitt with a bachelor's degree in elementary education in 1971. She taught school for five years in Pittsburgh, Atlanta and Washington, D.C., said Maddy Ross, Pitt's associate vice chancellor for national media affairs.

Campbell was the author of such best-sellers as "Your Blues Ain't Like Mine," published in 1992 and dealing with prejudice in the United States. It earned her an NAACP Image Award for literature. She followed that book with "Brothers and Sisters," which focused on race relations in the corporate world after the 1992 Los Angeles riot.

She also wrote children's books, including "Sometimes My Mommy Gets Angry" in 2003, which won the National Alliance for the Mentally Ill Outstanding Literature Award. …

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