Adoptive Families Embrace Asian Culture

By Pickels, Mary | Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, December 26, 2006 | Go to article overview

Adoptive Families Embrace Asian Culture


Pickels, Mary, Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review


The 2007 La Cultura series at the University of Pittsburgh at Greensburg will celebrate China, starting with a Jan. 13 dinner on campus.

The evening will include Chinese cuisine, master of ceremonies Rick Sebak, WQED's documentarian, and entertainment from the Organization of Chinese Americans Youth Performance Ensemble.

For the past five years, La Cultura's goal has been to promote global awareness and to help raise funds to send UPG students abroad to study. Lectures and a dinner focus on one country, and have included Italy, France, Spain, England and Greece. This year's lecture series is called "Visions of China."

Upcoming lectures include: Jan. 22, Dr. Monte Broaded, Butler University, "Does a Rising Tide Lift All Boats? Economic Growth and Inequality in China"; Feb. 12, poet Huang Xiang of Pittsburgh, "A Beast Drinking Wildly but Not Drunk: Huang Xiang, Poet of Freedom, in Performance"; and March 29, Professor Kong Ho, University of Pittsburgh at Bradford, "The Influence of Chinese Culture and Philosophy on the Art of Kong Ho."

All events will be held at 7 p.m. in the Hempfield Room of the campus's Chambers Hall and are open to the public, said William Pamerleau, associate professor of philosophy and lecture committee chairman.

After the first few years of La Cultura focused on European countries, Pamerleau said students and faculty suggested the program needed to be more diverse. China was selected because of its global impact on culture and economics, he said.

For more information on the La Cultura dinner, or to make reservations, call 724-836-7497.

For three years, Amy Min Gong has taught Chinese language and culture to children born in China and adopted by local families.

Gong believes it is important for these children to know their heritage, and she teaches them Chinese music and dances, along with colors and numbers. Gong, who was born in China and came to America 20 years ago, teaches Mandarin, the most widely spoken of the Chinese dialects.

The Westmoreland Chinese School, held each Saturday at Westmoreland County Community College, attracts between 20 and 40 students and family members.

"I would like them to know the traditions and their backgrounds," said Gong. "These kids are very interested in where they come from, what they look like."

Gong brought some of those children to the University of Pittsburgh at Greensburg Thursday night, where they performed dances with drums and ribbons and sang songs in Chinese.

Several area families who have adopted children from China addressed a group of students and community residents. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Adoptive Families Embrace Asian Culture
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.