Movie Reviews: 2007 Oscar Nominees

By Review, Tribune | Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, February 19, 2007 | Go to article overview
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Movie Reviews: 2007 Oscar Nominees


Review, Tribune, Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review


Read reviews of the main performances that were nominated for Oscars in 2007:

Click here for video clips of the nominees.

PICTURE

"Babel"

The movie shows how a series of random unfortunate choices provoke consequences that recall the Biblical story of Babel.

"Departed"

This crime film concerns a pair of double agents in Boston.

"Letters From Iwo Jima"

The film tells the Japanese experience, from a primarily sympathetic perspective.

"Little Miss Sunshine"

The humorously dysfunctional American family, often depicted in vacation mode, gets an affectionate working over in this movie.

"Queen"

This movie feels so authentic that you forget you're watching actors.

DIRECTOR

Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu in "Babel"

The movie shows how a series of random unfortunate choices provoke consequences that recall the Biblical story of Babel.

Martin Scorsese for "Departed"

This crime film concerns a pair of double agents in Boston.

Clint Eastwood for"Letters From Iwo Jima"

The film tells the Japanese experience, from a primarily sympathetic perspective.

Stephen Frears for "Queen"

This movie feels so authentic that you forget you're watching actors.

Paul Greengrass for "United 93"

You watch "United 93" from first frame to last with a knotted stomach.

ACTOR

Leonardo DiCaprio in "Blood Diamond"

The movie plays like a chaser to "Apocalypto".

Ryan Gosling in "Half Nelson"

This Low-keyed movie bids for raw honesty with its wearying portrayal of disillusionment and self-destruction.

Peter O'Toole in "Venus" (Not yet reviewed)

Will Smith in "Pursuit of Happyness"

The Pursuit of Happyness" may be based on the true story of Chris Gardner, but it is overloaded with the accidents of fiction.

Forest Whitaker in "Last King of Scotland"

A newly graduated Scottish doctor heads to Uganda and ends up as President Idi Amin's personal physician and adviser.

ACTRESS

Penelope Cruz in "Volver"

Penelope Cruz stars as Raimunda, a woman whose alcoholic husband has just lost his job and whose teenage daughter acts distant.

Judi Dench in "Notes on a Scandal"

That gifted porcupine of an actress, Judi Dench, unleashes her pointed weapons.

Helen Mirren in "Queen"

This movie feels so authentic that you forget you're watching actors.

Meryl Streep in "Devil Wears Prada"

Three decades later, Meryl Streep's accomplishments amaze as if she were a new kid using up her arsenal all at once.

Kate Winslet in "Little Children"

Characters exhale for a moment and inadvertently give themselves away by saying more than they intend.

SUPPORTING ACTOR

Alan Arkin in"Little Miss Sunshine"

The humorously dysfunctional American family, often depicted in vacation mode, gets an affectionate working over in this movie.

Jackie Earle Haley in "Little Children"

Characters exhale for a moment and inadvertently give themselves away by saying more than they intend.

Djimon Hounsou in "Blood Diamond"

The movie plays like a chaser to "Apocalypto".

Eddie Murphy in "Dreamgirls"

The right writer and the right director can make a movie musical work even better that its stage-musical parent.

Mark Wahlberg in "Departed"

This crime film concerns a pair of double agents in Boston.

SUPPORTING ACTRESS

Adriana Barraza in "Babel"

The movie shows how a series of random unfortunate choices provoke consequences that recall the Biblical story of Babel.

Abigail Breslin in "Little Miss Sunshine"

The humorously dysfunctional American family, often depicted in vacation mode, gets an affectionate working over in this movie.

Jennifer Hudson in "Dreamgirls"

The right writer and the right director can make a movie musical work even better that its stage-musical parent.

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