Eagles' McNabb off the Mark with Comments

By Harris, John | Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, September 23, 2007 | Go to article overview

Eagles' McNabb off the Mark with Comments


Harris, John, Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review


Donovan McNabb got it all wrong.

When you sign a $115 million contract extension, as McNabb did a few years ago, nobody wants to hear about your problems, real or otherwise.

McNabb's comments on HBO's Real Sports with Bryant Gumbel regarding criticism indiginous to black quarterbacks told an incomplete story.

It's tough being an NFL quarterback, regardless of race, religion or creed.

You're the toast of the town when you win, run out of town when you lose.

Of the current 32 starting quarterbacks, six are black. McNabb is one of them.

"There are not that many (black) quarterbacks, so we have to do a little bit extra,'' McNabb told HBO's James Brown in an interview conducted in August that aired last week for the first time.

Facing a firestorm of media criticism for his comments, McNabb responded on his blog at yardbarker.com.

"Black quarterbacks have to deal with different things than white quarterbacks," McNabb said. "If you don't think that's true, then you are naive."

Given his stature among NFL quarterbacks, regardless of race, along with the platform he was provided for the HBO interview, McNabb missed an opportunity to address the status of black quarterbacks in general instead of focusing on those like himself at the top of the food chain.

"It's unfortunate that he's (McNabb) going through it, but you can't really look at it and say race is an issue in Philly because Randall Cunningham was there all those years before him," said Steelers quarterback Charlie Batch, one of the 14 African-American quarterbacks in the NFL. "When Michael Vick went No. 1 (in the draft), I think that eliminated everything.

"You would like to think that now in '07 that (race) shouldn't be a factor. I don't necessarily think it's a factor, but every situation is different.''

Statistically speaking, it's actually easier for an African American to become a starting quarterback in the NFL than a backup or a No. …

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Eagles' McNabb off the Mark with Comments
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