On Guard against the Chinese

By Dateline D. C. | Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, September 23, 2007 | Go to article overview

On Guard against the Chinese


Dateline D. C., Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review


WASHINGTON

Alarm bells have sounded in many offices of Western governments and their allies.

From Washington through Canberra, to Paris, London and Berlin, government agencies have suffered several months of an onslaught by the "informationized armed forces" of China's People's Liberation Army (PLA).

When President George Bush met with Chinese President Hu Jintao two weeks ago in Australia, their agenda noted discussions on trade and global warming.

But when administration accounts of these meetings are published months hence, the record will show that the president expressed concerns to Hu relative to the penetration of the U.S. Defense Department's Niprnet.

That's a segment of the Pentagon's 35 internal networks that service some of their 3.5 million computers. The belief is the PLA officially sanctioned the hacking.

Hu denied the charge and aides pointed out that 120 other countries could actively pursue cyber warfare.

A few days later, President Nicolas Sarkozy of France said that his defense department had been under cyber attack but he believed that their firewalls had not been breached.

Two weeks ago, German Chancellor Angela Merkel raised the issue of cyber attacks on an official visit to China, saying that the government should "respect a set of game rules."

Merkel's strictures followed magazine reports that Chinese cyber- warfare equipment had been found in her foreign and economic departments and in her own office.

The FBI, whose agents are the frontline troops in the furtive wars of foreign counterintelligence and cyber warfare, is both alarmed and concerned about the increasing numbers of Chinese agents involved in espionage in the United States.

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