Is There a Trial Lawyer in the House?

By Coulter, Ann | Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, September 23, 2007 | Go to article overview

Is There a Trial Lawyer in the House?


Coulter, Ann, Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review


The only "crisis" in health care in this country is that doctors are paid too little. But the Democratic Party wails about how much they're paid while celebrating trial lawyers who only steal from the most valuable members of society.

It's only a matter of time before the best and brightest students forget about medical school and go to law school instead. You can make 30 times as much money as doctors by becoming a trial lawyer suing doctors.

You need no skills, no superior board scores, no decade of training and no sleepless residency. But you must have the morals of a drug dealer.

The editors of The New York Times have been engaging in a spirited debate with their readers over whether doctors are wildly overpaid or just hugely overpaid. The results of this debate were available on TimesSelect for just $49.95.

The Times editorializes that many health care economists say the partisan wrangling over health care masks a bigger problem: "the relatively high salaries paid to American doctors."

Citing the Rand Corp., The Times noted that doctors in the U.S. "earn two to three times as much as they do in other industrialized countries." American doctors earn about $200,000 to $300,000 a year, while European doctors make $60,000 to $120,000.

How much does Pinch Sulzberger make for driving The New York Times stock to an all-time low? Probably a lot more than your podiatrist.

In college, my roommate was in the chemistry lab Friday and Saturday nights; I danced on tables at the Chapter House. A few years later she was working 20-hour days as a resident at Mount Sinai doing liver transplants; I was frequenting popular Upper East Side drinking establishments.

She was going to Johns Hopkins for yet more medical training; I was skiing and following the Grateful Dead. Now she vacations in places like Rwanda and Darfur with Doctors Without Borders; I'm going to Paris.

Has anyone else noticed the nonexistence of a charitable organization known as "Lawyers Without Borders"?

My former roommate makes $380 for an emergency appendectomy, or 1/ 10,000th of what John Edwards made suing doctors like her, and one- fourth of what John Edwards' hairdresser makes for a single shag cut. …

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