Gore Can't Always Carry 49ers

By Gay, Nancy | Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, September 23, 2007 | Go to article overview

Gore Can't Always Carry 49ers


Gay, Nancy, Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review


Three games in, and the 49ers -- no longer invincible -- have discovered their own inconvenient truth: Frank Gore, playing his guts out week after week, cannot carry them.

Their 2-0 record, flimsily constructed out of Popsicle sticks, paste and a winning margin of four total points, disintegrated Sunday on the road once an elite NFL defense took direct aim at the 49ers' most dependable scoring threat.

The Steelers stacked the box, planted safety Troy Polamalu in the rushing lanes, blitzed quarterback Alex Smith and gradually overpowered their NFC West opponent, 37-16, sending streams of delirious Pittsburgh folks home from Heinz Field early.

And, yes, the 49ers did throw the ball to tight end Vernon Davis, as per his request. Not that he caught them all.

Or that his four receptions for 56 yards helped all that much, especially when referee Gerald Austin interpreted a third-quarter Davis catch-and-tumble reception at the Steelers' 32-yard line as an incomplete pass.

But as coach Mike Nolan pointed out, there was more variety in the heavily critiqued vanilla 49ers attack this week. More bootlegs for Smith, who finally threw his first touchdown pass, a 21-yarder to Taylor Jacobs in the blowout fourth quarter. More shotgun. An unusual pass attempt to heretofore unused vertical threat Ashley Lelie, who appeared to rationalize Nolan's lack of faith in his free- agent wideout by dropping the ball.

Gore, along with his teammates on offense, realize they no longer can live by the run on first and second down, or the what-the-heck field goal. Certainly they can't depend on the generosity of their mistake-prone division opponents.

"I tried. But they came and played good defense," said Gore, a man of few words and simple truths who had only 14 carries for 39 yards against the Steelers' third-ranked defense. "We've just got to play better offense right now. We're struggling."

By failing to capitalize early on prime opportunities -- particularly, a first-quarter sack of Ben Roethlisberger, along with a forced fumble and fumble recovery by linebacker Hannibal Navies that was wasted when the drive stalled at the Steelers' 4 -- the 49ers practically invited the ensuing fourth-quarter rout.

"It's real frustrating. Like I said, you get a touchdown, it's better for the team. Three points is good, but seven points is better," said Gore, who was inconsolable afterward. "It would have been a better game."

Settling for three points time after time because of dropped passes, poorly timed routes and a lack of urgency has caught up to the 49ers, and they're now 2-1 with a renewed sense of purpose. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Gore Can't Always Carry 49ers
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.