Methodical Approach Keys Vikings' Victory

By Rankin, Jamie | Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, September 22, 2007 | Go to article overview

Methodical Approach Keys Vikings' Victory


Rankin, Jamie, Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review


Mt. Pleasant coach Mark Lyons said, for him, patience was a key component in Friday's Keystone Conference matchup against Belle Vernon. Lyons used up a good bit of that patience, but it was worth it. The Vikings scored 10 unanswered points in the final quarter to get past the visiting Leopards, 10-7.

"I wrote myself a little note, and it said, 'Be patient,' " Lyons said. "I don't know if I was patient enough in the first half. I was kind of upset with myself for not being patient, so I tried to be patient in the second half."

Mt. Pleasant (3-1, 2-0) had possession for all but a few minutes of the first half, but the team's own impatience cost it. The Vikings' offense was flagged for four false starts in the first half. One of those penalties put the Vikings in a second-and-16 situation in the second quarter from which they couldn't recover, and two plays after the ensuing punt, Belle Vernon tailback Shane Curran broke a few tackles and ran 72 yards for a touchdown. Adam Gillingham's extra point gave the Leopards a 7-0 lead.

Curran had 126 yards on 10 carries.

Mt. Pleasant got the ball back for a 15-play drive that took them inside Belle Vernon's 10, but Matt Remaley's 26-yard field goal attempt was no good, and the Vikings went into the locker room still trailing.

Mt. Pleasant continued to control the ball in the second half, but the defensive efforts of Jeff Ambrose and Jon Krepps kept the Vikings scoreless through the third quarter. But Ambrose, Krepps, and the rest of the Leopards' defensive corps eventually began to tire.

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