Pine Cove Has Long History as a Recreational Spot

By Paglia, Ron | Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, June 8, 2008 | Go to article overview

Pine Cove Has Long History as a Recreational Spot


Paglia, Ron, Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review


The oldies dance July 14 at Pine Cove Beach Club in Fallowfield will celebrate the 1960s and early 1970s in the popular swimming site's history, but the legacy of recreational activities there started long before that.

A story in the June 18, 1927 edition of The Charleroi Mail called attention to Nelson Bathing Beach on the Charleroi-Bentleyville Road opening "about July 3."

It touted the new site as "one of the best constructed beaches in Western Pennsylvania ... 250 feet by 100 feet with a depth of eight feet running back to the entrance. It will be unusually well supplied with fine well water."

The story further notes that Nelson Beach "has 65 acres of ground ... for picnic grounds and parking space. No charges will be made for use of the grounds for picnics nor parking." Another feature was a refreshment stand "on the grounds to serve the people at all times."

The Westside Electric Street Railway cars "will stop at the entrance to the beach" and the "omnibus will also have a stop at the entrance, thus making it convenient for every person to reach the beach, either by automobile, street care or the bus service."

Individuals interested in engaging use of the grounds for private picnic parties were encouraged to call "Mr.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Pine Cove Has Long History as a Recreational Spot
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.