Online System to Allow Crime Victims Track Perpetrators' Release

By Foreman, Chris | Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, June 8, 2008 | Go to article overview

Online System to Allow Crime Victims Track Perpetrators' Release


Foreman, Chris, Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review


Rick Laughery's boys have suffered more than their share of bad luck on Fayette County roads because of dangerous drivers.

After two frightening crashes -- and experiences with the criminal justice system -- within 20 months, Laughery said he's heartened by an online notification program spreading throughout the state to alert crime victims and community members about a county prison inmate's release, transfer to a state lockup or escape.

The North Union father is eager to know when two drunken drivers might be back on the streets.

One is the intoxicated woman who in April 2007 smashed into a car in which his 17-year-old son, Derek, was a passenger. The other is the unlicensed man caught driving while drunk just 11 months after a hit-and-run crash that threw Laughery's then-8-year-old son off his motorbike and caused fractures to his left leg and a broken wrist.

The male driver was sentenced to 3 to 23 months in Fayette County Prison for the crash that left Nicholas Laughery with a metal rod in his leg.

"It sure didn't seem like to me that it was fair, considering what he did to my boy," Rick Laughery said.

While several county prisons in the region have manual systems for notifying crime victims about a defendant's status, citizens soon will have a fail-safe way of receiving updates.

The Pennsylvania Commission on Crime and Delinquency and the Pennsylvania District Attorney's Institute are using a $1.25 million federal grant to implement the Pennsylvania Statewide Automated Victim Information and Notification, PA SAVIN, service through computers at county prisons.

Pennsylvania is one of 13 states working to utilize the network.

The free, automated, real-time service allows crime victims, their families and community members to register for information about a county inmate's prison status by calling 1-866-9PA-SAVIN or visiting www.vinelink.com.

The recipient of a notification call or e-mail must punch in a four-digit number to verify an account and receive the information.

Twenty-eight of the state's 67 counties were linked into the system by the start of June, while Snyder County was scheduled to go online last Friday.

In this region, only Washington and Somerset counties already offer the service, although many officials in the Greater Pittsburgh area reported being in various stages of implementation this spring. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Online System to Allow Crime Victims Track Perpetrators' Release
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.