Zito Relishes Role as Spoiler

By Grupp, John | Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, June 8, 2008 | Go to article overview

Zito Relishes Role as Spoiler


Grupp, John, Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review


ELMONT, N.Y. -- Nick Zito didn't apologize this time.

Four years after the Hall of Fame trainer crashed the "Smarty Party," Zito found himself in a similar position as the spoiler.

And he was loving it.

"Obviously," he said, "we like these classic races."

Zito-trained Da' Tara won the Belmont Stakes by 5 1/4 lengths on Saturday afternoon in an upset that is nearly as shocking as Big Brown's epic last-place collapse.

In 2004, Zito-trained Birdstone passed a tiring Smarty Jones in the final 100 yards, crushing the hopes of a record crowd at Belmont. Afterward, Zito expressed regret for depriving America of a Triple Crown from its favorite horse.

Yesterday, Zito used another horse given little chance of winning to stun an undefeated champ and deny the sport he loves its first Triple winner since 1978.

"I had a good feeling," Zito said. "Believe me, I was in some other orbit. Trust me. It was a great feeling."

Da' Tara, whose only other victory in seven career starts came in a maiden special weight in Gulfstream last December, was 38-1 in the Belmont. Birdstone was 36-1.

Da' Tara, who paid $79, became the first wire-to-wire winner since Swale in 1984.

The victory was sweet for owner Robert LaPenta, who also owns War Pass, last year's 2-year-old champion. War Pass was knocked off the Triple Crown trail in April.

Zito bought the horse for $175,000 as a yearling at Saratoga and asked LaPenta to refrain from selling the dark brown colt.

"He was an absolutely spectacular looking horse," Zito said.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Zito Relishes Role as Spoiler
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.