Mt. Lebanon Neighbors Bond in the Joy of an Immigrant

By Togneri, Chris | Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, June 8, 2008 | Go to article overview

Mt. Lebanon Neighbors Bond in the Joy of an Immigrant


Togneri, Chris, Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review


Five years ago, Otto Limongi moved his family from Venezuela to America in search of a better life.

On Saturday, in the Mt. Lebanon neighborhood where they settled, strangers picked through the remnants of the Limongis' life here during an estate sale.

Otto Limongi died two weeks ago of cancer. His death spread sadness through a now-tight neighborhood that credited the Limongis with bringing them together; and because Limongi, a general contractor, was the family's only breadwinner, it left the family with no way to support themselves.

Otto Limongi's wife, Ragna, and their five children are moving back to Venezuela. The neighborhood organized yesterday's estate sale to offset shipping and travel costs.

"I feel like I'm packing up a good friend," said Aimee Lamendola, 37, a friend and neighbor. "I met them the day their containers arrived. I helped them unpack. They were so open and welcoming and warm. I took to them immediately."

Ragna Limongi was too emotional to watch the sale. She left early in the morning with her youngest children.

Friends and neighbors also struggled to maintain their composure. But, they said, at least it gave them something to do other than mourn Otto Limongi's death and the impending departure of the family.

So they laid Otto Limongi's tools out in the garage and driveway and hung the children's clothes on racks in the kitchen. Ragna Limongi's oldest daughter, Anjuli Manriqui, 19, tried to sell the family's beds straight out of the upstairs bedrooms.

As neighborhood kids sold lemonade to raise more money, the adults talked quietly about how the family had changed their lives. Before the Limongis came, they said, people on Vermont Avenue were friendly, but closed off from one another. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Mt. Lebanon Neighbors Bond in the Joy of an Immigrant
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.