CMS Includes Oklahoma in Electronic Health Records Program

By Shottenkirk, Jerry | THE JOURNAL RECORD, June 17, 2008 | Go to article overview
Save to active project

CMS Includes Oklahoma in Electronic Health Records Program


Shottenkirk, Jerry, THE JOURNAL RECORD


Federal and state government health officials said on Monday Oklahoma was one of 12 states selected for a Medicare electronic health records demonstration project that will reimburse doctors up to $58,000 and practices up to $290,000 for switching over to an electronic system.

As many as 1,200 doctors and primary care practices in the U.S. will be eligible for Medicare incentives if they choose to participate in the program.

Four of the states will begin the program this year. Oklahoma is in the second tier and is expected to begin in fall 2009.

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services Acting Director Kerry Weems and Oklahoma Health Secretary Michael Crutcher made the announcement at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center.

Russell Kohl, who has a family practice in Vinita, said electronic health records are worth the investment.

"When I started my practice, I invested over $70,000 in electronic medical records," he said. "When I started there were no financial rewards other than the efficiency of the office and quality of care."

Kohl said he's estimated that paper charts cost $4 over time. "Those add up. Having electronic records allows me to see that I'm doing a better job," he said. "Without them, I'd normally be using 3x5 cards or trying to keep Excel spreadsheets."

Efficiency and fewer mistakes is the goal of the program. Weems said the program will reduce errors and improve health outcomes for 3.6 million Americans.

Melissa Johnson, director of health care policy for the Oklahoma State Medical Association, and Craig Jones, president of the Oklahoma Hospital Association, said the payoff in electronic health records doesn't come in the form of money, but instead, comes in the form of accuracy and performance.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited article

CMS Includes Oklahoma in Electronic Health Records Program
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?