Diary

By Byrnes, Sholto | The Independent (London, England), April 28, 2002 | Go to article overview
Save to active project

Diary


Byrnes, Sholto, The Independent (London, England)


Iain Duncan Smith may soon get the same treatment as William Hague. By that, I don't mean ignominious rejection by the voters (although that's quite possible too, of course), but a sympathetic television documentary. Charlotte Metcalf, the independent film- maker responsible for Channel 4's Just William - And Ffion, has IDS (right) in her sights. He hasn't said yes yet, but she thinks he will because his advisers will persuade him he should. Metcalf is a Labour supporter whose CV includes shooting a political broadcast for Tony Blair, but her Hague documentary was thought to have shown the former Tory leader in a favourable light. There was plenty of Hague the down-to-earth Yorkshireman, and the touching revelation that he would have given up his ambition to lead the Tories if Ffion had asked him not to run. I'm sure we're all dying to know more about Duncan Smith too.

The Queen and Prince Philip invited the lions into their Windsor den on Thursday night, where they held a reception for select members of the Fourth Estate. Her Majesty was quite happy to put uppity journalists in their place, replying to one who asked if she read the papers: "Read them? Certainly not. I look at them." There was also a noticeably large contingent from the republican press, luminaries from The Guardian and The Observer, and New Statesman editor Peter Wilby. "Polly Toynbee was within feet of Princess Anne," says one excited admirer, "but Polly looked far more regal, in a wonderful dress. And she had a lady-in-waiting with her: the Princess Royal, that is, not Polly."

As well as approaching politicians to appear on The Weakest Link, the BBC is trying to set up a show with contestants drawn from the world of fashion. At Conde Nast Traveller's party last week the designer Jacques Azagury told me that he had been asked to take part, but wasn't sure whether he would or not.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited article

Diary
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?