Inequity Found in City Staff's Pay

By Boren, Jeremy | Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, September 6, 2008 | Go to article overview
Save to active project

Inequity Found in City Staff's Pay


Boren, Jeremy, Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review


One minority member and no women are among the 10 highest wage earners in Pittsburgh's government, a sign of racial and gender pay inequalities that some critics say pervades the city's work force.

A Tribune-Review analysis of the city's 3,203 employees shows women's salaries are an average of $9,749 less than those of men; and black employees receive salaries that are, on average, $5,570 less than white employees.

Though women make up about 25 percent of the city's work force, they earn about 21 percent of the city's $145.86 million base payroll. The figures do not include overtime.

"The dearth of women in management means that their salaries are going to be lower," said Susan B. Hansen, a University of Pittsburgh professor who studies gender wage disparities. "Another factor is that many women are clustered in clerical positions that are union positions."

Hansen said civil service hiring rules should be blind to race and gender, meaning that a municipality is capable of creating an employee pool that could double as a cross-section of the city's population. For instance, Washington has the best pay equity rates in the nation because of its high number of government jobs, she said.

"But (Pittsburgh) is a city that still runs on patronage and who knows whom," Hansen said.

Barbara Trant, director of the Department of Personnel and Civil Service Commission, said Mayor Luke Ravenstahl is taking steps to hire more women and minorities, but added that it's premature to conclude that women and minorities don't receive fair pay from the city when compared to their white, male counterparts.

"We have a ways to go in our minority hiring in order for our city employee population to look like the city at-large population," Trant said. "Other than that, a lot of our positions within the city are just generally geared in some way towards a male applicant. So I'm not sure what you learn from your analysis."

A March study from Pitt's Center for Social and Urban Research found that American women make 64 cents for every $1 men make. In Pittsburgh, women made 58 cents to every $1 a man made working in the same position.

The Pitt study accounted for education, age, marital status, work experience, children and other factors that influence salaries. The Trib's analysis of city wages does not take those factors into account because such details are not publicly available for each city employee.

Trant said she wants to see results of a $92,000 gender and race wage disparity study to be done by Evergreen Solutions of Tallahassee, Fla.

The study will begin once Ravenstahl's office signs the contract and accepts a $20,000 donation from the Women and Girls Foundation of Southwest Pennsylvania. Taxpayers will pick up the remaining $72,000.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Inequity Found in City Staff's Pay
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.