Greek Fans Storm Istanbul to Back Their `Achilles of Pop' in Eurovision

By Howden, Daniel | The Independent (London, England), May 15, 2004 | Go to article overview
Save to active project

Greek Fans Storm Istanbul to Back Their `Achilles of Pop' in Eurovision


Howden, Daniel, The Independent (London, England)


A SINGLE topless Greek warrior is preparing to storm Istanbul for the greater glory of his country tonight, armed with a microphone and tight leather trousers.

Forget this summer's Olympics in Athens and Euro 2004 in Portugal: if there is one prize the Greeks are intent on winning this year it is the Eurovision song contest.

Greece's modern-day Achilles is Sakis Rouvas, a low-rent Mediterranean version of Ricky Martin, whose high-energy disco and sugary ballads have made him the unchallenged king of pop in his homeland.

This following has travelled with him. The Turkish capital has not seen this many Greeks since the fall of Constantinople. Thousands have flocked across the Aegean, decked out in commemorative white T-shirts speckled with blue sequins in the shape of the Hellenic flag.

One Rouvas fan, Angeliki Zissi, told The Independent from Istanbul: "This is not a joke; this is serious. Sakis is going to win it for Greece and we're going to be there."

Greece's quest to conquer a competition that is widely regarded elsewhere in Europe as an amusing kitsch ball began three years ago when a Greco- Swedish act took the country to the unprecedented heights of third place. Prior to the whiff of success enjoyed by the Greek-born Swedes, Antique, the country's main contribution to Eurovision folklore was to exchange 12 points with Cyprus with the regularity of a metronome.

Two fallow years followed as faded 1980s performers won through bitter selection processes as if on a mission to remind the growing television audience in Greece that third place had been an accident.

The veteran rocker Michalis Rakintzis's "S.A.G.A.P.O." - from the Greek "I Love You" - finished 17th out of 24, prompting him to sue the producers in Estonia for sabotaging his unique sound.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited article

Greek Fans Storm Istanbul to Back Their `Achilles of Pop' in Eurovision
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?