RUTH BRANDON: With a Name like Edsel, It Had to Flop

By Brandon, Ruth | The Independent (London, England), September 14, 2004 | Go to article overview
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RUTH BRANDON: With a Name like Edsel, It Had to Flop


Brandon, Ruth, The Independent (London, England)


TRYING TO park the other day, I was elbowed out of the way by a towering 4x4 called, suitably fascistically, the Daewoo Musso. The Musso! What can they have been thinking of, out in Korea? Are they expecting it to end its days hanging from a lamp-post by its back wheels? (It would, if I had my way.) But then again, why should a load of 30-year-olds in Seoul be expected to know about 20th- century European history? You'd think they might have asked around.

Boobs of this sort are not uncommon. Car marques are sold worldwide, and any name is liable to touch the wrong nerve somewhere. The Chevrolet Nova bombed in Spain because Nova in Spanish means "won't go" (no va). The Fiat Rustica, rural in Italy, hit Britain at a moment when Fiats, designed for sunny Italy, were notoriously dissolving into rust in the rain. It swiftly turned into the Panda, which, being furry, has no rust problems.

Ford was particularly prone to naming disasters. When they marketed their Caliente in Brazil, they learned, too late, that this was the local term for a prostitute. They didn't do very well with the Probe, either; it sounded too rude. "What's your new car?" "A Probe." No, you couldn't say it. And nobody wants to buy a joke.

The biggest Ford disaster of all was the Edsel. Some 16,000 names were considered, including several from the poet Marianne Moore, whose proposals included Utopian Turtletop, Intelligent Bullet, and Mongoose Civique (the inspiration for the Honda Civic?).

But Ford, rejecting all of them, decided to call its new 1957 model after Henry Ford's son and heir. It was a bad omen: Henry despised Edsel, whom he harried to an early death. Although the public was probably unaware of this, it could never take to the vast Edsel car, whose door-handles tended to drop off, and which had push- button gears on the steering-wheel hub. Even if people managed to open and shut the doors, they couldn't believe it was possible to operate the gears independently of the steering.

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