Book Review: Beancounter, Bureaucrat or Business Genius? ; Leadership and Management in the 21st Century - Business Challenges of the Future EDITED BY CARY COOPER OXF. UNIV. PRESS; Pounds 25

The Independent on Sunday (London, England), January 3, 2005 | Go to article overview
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Book Review: Beancounter, Bureaucrat or Business Genius? ; Leadership and Management in the 21st Century - Business Challenges of the Future EDITED BY CARY COOPER OXF. UNIV. PRESS; Pounds 25


What sort of management style will work best for the growing business in the next decade: the Hollywood model where a group of self-employed professionals come together to make a film and depart when it's completed; the investment trust where investors choose the management; or the university model where academics are given a platform and a basis for study and will probably be expected to develop money-making ventures as well.

These three models are put forward by The Independent's own Hamish McRae - one of 22 authors, leading management academics, economists and industrialists brought together by Professor Cary Cooper to explore changing management and leadership styles in the 21st century.

Just how powerfully are we influenced by new trends, new challenges, or conventional styles? Do you still prefer the autocratic type, the bureaucrat, the bean counter or the owner- manager who likes consensus or getting everyone involved?

Are the competences which we've heard so much about in recent years so important, when the skills that really count are flair in marketing, logistics and new product innovation? If there is one thing which will distinguish 21st century organisations from the past, according to Sir Michael Bicham of the University of the Arts, it will be their creativity and innovation. This should apply even more strongly to niche companies and smaller businesses generally.

For global companies the key question must be what kind of leaders are going to be needed in future? A banker, Prabhu Guptara of UBS, sees global markets biased towards mega-corporations, but also towards an enormous number of niche players, represented by entrepreneurs able to move fast to exploit windows of opportunity where big corporates are blind, uninterested or slow to move in.

Bias towards the mega and the niche, he believes, will have one serious consequence: stripping out the middle-sized company through mergers and acquisitions, as has happened in banking and many other industries. But why should this lead to the decline of the middle classes and the professions, as he predicts?

Professor Keith Grint of Lancaster University Management School makes the salutary point that the authoritarian and absolutist models of political and business leadership have gradually changed from tyrannies to participation democracies, but he questions whether less hierarchical, virtual organisations relying on sophisticated technology and more educated workers need traditional modes of leadership.

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Book Review: Beancounter, Bureaucrat or Business Genius? ; Leadership and Management in the 21st Century - Business Challenges of the Future EDITED BY CARY COOPER OXF. UNIV. PRESS; Pounds 25
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