50 Making a Difference Profile: Janet K. Levit, University of Tulsa College of Law

By Record, Journal | THE JOURNAL RECORD, September 26, 2008 | Go to article overview

50 Making a Difference Profile: Janet K. Levit, University of Tulsa College of Law


Record, Journal, THE JOURNAL RECORD


Personal and professional success rest on three basic principles: excellence, decency and community. These values are the bedrock from which I intend to build the best law school in the region." It's a bold statement, but Janet Levit is in a position to make it come true.

Her prestigious law career has included working for international and national firms, leading to her present post as dean and professor at the University of Tulsa College of Law. Under her watch, the college successfully completed a recent American Bar Association accreditation visit. Plus, it boasts the highest Oklahoma bar exam passage rates for February 2008 and has enrolled a first-year law class with the strongest academic profile in the college's history.

In addition to her dean's duties, Levit assisted the U.S. District Court in assessing candidates for the federal public defender position and served as chair for the Oklahoma Bar Association's International Law & Practice Section.

Levit graduated magna cum laude from Princeton University's Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, was named Phi Beta Kappa, and went on to earn her law degree from Yale University, where she was a an articles editor for the Yale Journal of International Law. She earned her juris doctorate from Yale Law School, as well as her master's degree in international relations. Levit is a widely recognized scholar in the areas of international law, commercial law, human rights, contracts and administrative law. Prior to her TU position, she was associate general counsel for the Export-Import Bank of the United States (where she received its 1999 Meritorious Service Award) and for TradeCard Inc. At The University of Tulsa, she received the law school's 2006 Outstanding Upper Division Teaching Award.

"I have known Janet for 15 years, and she has consistently exhibited the highest standards of personal integrity, excellent leadership skills and dedication to family and community," said colleague and former TU College of Law Dean Robert Butkin.

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