Rise & Shine ; Who Will Be the Rising Stars of 2005? over the Next 10 Pages, the Independent's Experts in Art, Literature, Fashion, Politics, Film, Architecture, Music, Gardening, Design, Photography, Food and Sport Offer Their Predictions. Compiled by Caroline Kamp

By Michael Glover, Julian Hall, Jay Merrick, Matt Tench, Andrew Grice, Fiona Sturges, Roger Clarke, Boyd Tonkin, Caroline Stacey, Michael Church, Fiona Rattray, Susannah Frankel, Anna Pavord | The Independent (London, England), January 1, 2005 | Go to article overview
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Rise & Shine ; Who Will Be the Rising Stars of 2005? over the Next 10 Pages, the Independent's Experts in Art, Literature, Fashion, Politics, Film, Architecture, Music, Gardening, Design, Photography, Food and Sport Offer Their Predictions. Compiled by Caroline Kamp


Michael Glover, Julian Hall, Jay Merrick, Matt Tench, Andrew Grice, Fiona Sturges, Roger Clarke, Boyd Tonkin, Caroline Stacey, Michael Church, Fiona Rattray, Susannah Frankel, Anna Pavord, The Independent (London, England)


Art by Michael Glover

Varda Caivano, 33, was snapped up by the Victoria Miro Gallery in London even before she graduated from the Royal College of Art in the summer of 2004. Her first solo show at the gallery is scheduled for May, which will represent a quite astonishing career trajectory: less than 12 months from graduate student to a solo show in the gallery which currently represents artists such as Chris Ofili, Peter Doig and Grayson Perry. Graham Crowley, her former professor at the Royal College of Art, has no doubt that she deserves it. "She's one hundred metres ahead of the rest," he said this week, "in her sense of art history, her intensity of commitment and her sheer intelligence."

Caivano, who is part Danish and part Italian on her father's side, and Argentinian on her mother's, grew up in Argentina, and now has a studio in Islington, where she makes densely worked abstract paintings of a fairly modest size in a decidedly post-Romantic tradition. Delicate, sensitive and intuitive, they seem like movements towards depictions of objects and landscapes which stop just short of their goal. "Painting for me is a way of questioning images," she comments, "where visible objects with a secret depth appear to reveal a kind of irrational truth."

Others to watch

Daniel Sinsel, 28. His wonderfully meticulous paintings of impossible objects in strange juxtaposition with each other look, in their crispness and sureness of touch, as if they might have been painted in the 18th century. But it is an 18th-century sensibility which has arrived here via an immersion in Surrealism. Sinsel will have his first solo show at Sadie Coles HQ next year. Barnaby Hosking, 26. As painting revives, so more recent innovations - video art for example - begin to look tired and repetitive. An exception to this is the work by Norwich-born video artist Barnaby Hosking. Hosking's videos fascinate and engage because he projects them on to velvet, and he makes videos in conjunction with objects - a painting for example - asking us to consider how one relates to the other. Simon Keenleyside, 29. A regular in group shows, Keenleyside makes fantastical landscape paintings based on remembered scenes from his upbringing in Essex. He paints woodlands; the painted surfaces are rich brash, excitable, bizarre. He is a young master of invented landscape.

Portrait by Kalpesh Lathigra

Comedy by Julian Hall

Andrew Maxwell, 30.

However dubious the honour of winning Channel 4's Kings of Comedy may seem, there is no doubt that likeable Irish comedian Andrew Maxwell will continue to pick up acclaim from all quarters. The youthful Maxwell has already been performing for 12 years. This experience speaks for itself in his ability to mimic voices and movements, and also in his measured storytelling technique with which he tackles issues such as political ideology and even paedophilia fairly and intelligently. This style was shown off to great effect in his show, This Is My Hour, which won near universal acclaim in Edinburgh this year. Maxwell, a survivor from Channel 4's ill-fated RISE, is no stranger to television. Apart from a number of domestic credits he has appeared on Late Show with David Letterman in the US, a testimony to the width of his appeal. It won't be long before he gets a more permanent TV mooring and has the chance to develop his image.

Others to watch

Miles Jupp, 25, is currently in the last few days of a stadium tour of Scotland playing Archie the inventor, his character in the CBBC's Balamory. It was as another less agreeable toff in the 2003 Edinburgh hit, Gentleman Prefer Brogues, that he made his name on the comedy circuit. Jupp is planning a new solo show this year and promises to become as popular with adults as with children.

Alan Carr, 28. Think Kenneth Williams with Eric Morecambe's glasses and you get nearer to the image and charm of Alan Carr.

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Rise & Shine ; Who Will Be the Rising Stars of 2005? over the Next 10 Pages, the Independent's Experts in Art, Literature, Fashion, Politics, Film, Architecture, Music, Gardening, Design, Photography, Food and Sport Offer Their Predictions. Compiled by Caroline Kamp
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