Charter Schools in Oklahoma City Find Success Where Traditional Schools Fail

By Francis-Smith, Janice | THE JOURNAL RECORD, October 3, 2008 | Go to article overview

Charter Schools in Oklahoma City Find Success Where Traditional Schools Fail


Francis-Smith, Janice, THE JOURNAL RECORD


Ivan Cantera surprised his friends - even himself - by making it to the 11th grade. Only one thing was more unexpected than his ability to meet and even succeed the academic requirements for advancement, the handsome, clean-cut teenager told a group of lawmakers gathered Thursday. The big surprise is that Cantera is still alive.

"Back in middle school, people wouldn't see me alive now," said Cantera, on Thursday nattily dressed in a black pinstriped shirt, white tie and fashionably framed glasses. "I was into gangbanging, drugs, all that nonsense. Principal Brewer changed my life. I play sports now, no more fighting, no more doing drugs. The only way to go is up, and that's the way I'm going."

The principal Cantera spoke of is Chris Brewer, head of Oklahoma City's Santa Fe South High School at 1537 NE 24th St. The high school and junior high school are both charter schools, public schools that have been freed by the district to operate independently and to implement different ways of teaching.

Members of the House Education Committee met Thursday to discuss how some charter schools in high-poverty, urban areas are graduating successful students while their neighboring public schools continue to garner low test scores and high dropout rates.

Cantera said he's getting a scholarship from the Oklahoma Higher Learning Access Program. He's still undecided as to whether he will continue his education at Oklahoma City University or the University of Central Oklahoma.

Ninety-one percent of Santa Fe South High School's students are minorities; 90 percent are eligible for free or reduced price lunches. Many wind up at Santa Fe South after having been unsuccessful at other schools.

"I went to Capitol Hill High School, and it was nothing like Santa Fe South," said Rocio Esparza, a senior at the school. She had planned on dropping out before she started at Santa Fe South. "I found myself there, I learned to believe in myself, and I'm a stronger person because of it. I will be the first person in my family, in five generations, to graduate high school and college." Esparza said she plans to study nursing at the University of Oklahoma. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Charter Schools in Oklahoma City Find Success Where Traditional Schools Fail
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.