Donating Conservation Easements Helps Ensure Preservation

By Vellucci, Justin | Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, September 22, 2008 | Go to article overview

Donating Conservation Easements Helps Ensure Preservation


Vellucci, Justin, Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review


Nine years ago, Ken Gfroerer traded in a home in Green Tree for the natural wonders of the Laurel Highlands, moving an hour east to a 51-acre farm where he and his wife, Lisa, could ski, hike and maintain a large organic garden.

They wanted to preserve the land as well as live on it. So, they donated what's called a conservation easement.

"If you really have a bond with your land and you really care about it, it's a way to permanently protect it," said Gfroerer, 43, of Stahlstown in Westmoreland County. "Everything's the same. The only thing that's different is you can't develop it. You can't break it into parcels and sell it (but) really, you can continue to use it the same."

The trend of donating conservation easements -- essentially giving away a property's development rights to a group that pledges to preserve the land -- is growing in Pennsylvania, conservationists say. About 10 percent of the 50,000 acres the Nature Conservancy protects in Pennsylvania fall under those types of easements, a tool landowners have used to protect 4 million acres nationwide. The Western Pennsylvania Conservancy has added 30,474 acres to that growing total, many of them in Allegheny and Westmoreland counties.

"The great benefit of conservation easements is that they effectively conserve land in perpetuity, while also keeping property in private hands," said Stephanie Kraynick, a Western Pennsylvania Conservancy spokeswoman. "They provide tax benefits, protect land from subdivision and fragmentation, and still allow the land to contribute to the local economy."

Those tax benefits soon could become the subject of congressional debate. House members have introduced a bill to make permanent tax incentives for those donating conservation easements. The measure, which has been jointly introduced in the Senate, could be debated early next year.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Donating Conservation Easements Helps Ensure Preservation
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.