Briefs: Package Goes MAD for Art in New York

By reports, and wire | Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, November 16, 2008 | Go to article overview

Briefs: Package Goes MAD for Art in New York


reports, and wire, Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review


On Sept. 27, the Museum of Arts and Design (MAD) in New York revealed its new Columbus Circle space, bringing the works of contemporary artists and designers from around the world to its new home. The 54,000-square-foot building offers triple the space of MAD's previous facility and reinvigorates a renewed Columbus Circle. To celebrate, the Buckingham Hotel has partnered with the Museum of Arts and Design to offer guests a special MAD Package in honor of the museum's new location, starting at $299 per night through Dec. 28.

The cost includes two tickets to four major exhibitions including "Second Lives: Remixing the Ordinary." The classic, boutique-style hotel is just an avenue away from the MAD's new, impressive space, in the heart of Manhattan's cultural district. A two-night minimum stay is required. The special package may be booked online by using the promotional code,"GO MAD."

Details: 888-511-1900.

Gladiators in 3-D

Ever wonder how a gladiator fight looked from the front row of the Colosseum?

"Rewind Rome," a 3-D simulation presented in a theater a few steps from the ruined arena, will offer visitors the chance to experience the monuments and daily life of the ancient capital. Virtual tourists will see the simulation on a giant screen and animated characters will guide them through the streets of Rome as they appeared in A.D. 310, with grandiose bas-reliefs on triumphal arches and less ambitious graffiti scrawled by vandals on buildings.

The show opens to the public Nov. 20 and can be followed with earphones in eight languages. The show is based on a simulation created as a scientific tool by experts at the University of California in Los Angeles. Some of the reconstructed monuments include the Forum, ancient Rome's center of power, and the temple of Vesta, where visitors will spy on a secret rite dedicated to the pagan goddess. While the setting is based on archaeological evidence, commercial developers jazzed up the simulation by adding characters such as the Emperor Maxentius, who governed Rome at the time, and a host of lions and gladiators battling to the death for a cheering crowd in the Colosseum.

Details: Web site.

Outdoors in New England

The Appalachian Mountain Club in Boston is extending its new family weekend series through the winter with programs that range from snowshoeing and cross-country skiing to animal-tracking and learning how to build a snow shelter. There's even a holiday- oriented "Gingerbread Weekend" where families learn to build a gingerbread house in between winter walks and hikes with AMC guides. …

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Briefs: Package Goes MAD for Art in New York
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