UPMC Names Starzl Chief

By Andrew Conte; Luis Fabregas | Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, December 16, 2008 | Go to article overview

UPMC Names Starzl Chief


Andrew Conte; Luis Fabregas, Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review


The new chief of transplantation at University of Pittsburgh Medical Center said Monday that UPMC did the right thing by scrutinizing how often recipients of a live-donor liver transplant run into problems.

Dr. Abhinav Humar praised UPMC for reviewing complications from the controversial procedure, which is one of his specialties. Dr. Thomas Starzl, a retired UPMC surgeon who performed the world's first liver transplant, initiated the review and said he expects it to show that 65 percent of recipients experience a serious complication.

"It's a matter of recognizing the complications and having a good handle on them," Humar said. "One of the good things that really came out of this is that Dr. Starzl made a good effort to quantify this in its completeness."

Humar's appointment, announced yesterday, follows a tumultuous period at UPMC's world-renowned transplant program. The center's most recent chief, Dr. Amadeo Marcos, resigned in March, one day before UPMC announced the live-donor liver transplant review.

The leadership upheaval at UPMC's transplant program came days before the Tribune-Review published a four-month investigation about liver transplants. The stories focused on surgeries that are performed on patients at the bottom of waiting lists and whose chances of dying increase with transplants.

Observers within the transplant community believe that Humar's appointment was made at a critical time for the program and that he has the qualities to succeed and move it forward.

"Dr. Humar is an up-and-coming, very highly regarded surgeon," said Dr. Goran Klintmalm, past president of the American Society of Transplant Surgeons and chief of transplantation at Baylor Transplant Institute in Dallas. "He is a very bright young man."

The Tribune-Review in October reported that Humar was one of three finalists for the job, which involves overseeing all clinical work as well as clinical research. The other candidates were Dr. Pierre-Alain Clavien and Dr. J. Wallis Marsh Jr., the interim chief since Marcos' departure.

Marsh wrote yesterday in an e-mail that he plans to stay at UPMC.

"Dr. Humar is a great person, and I'm pleased he accepted the position," Marsh said.

Although he has experience in the field of using live donors for liver transplants, Humar said he brings knowledge to UPMC from varying aspects of transplantation. He has spent nine years at the University of Minnesota and said he had not sought another job before he was offered the opportunity to run Pittsburgh's program.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

UPMC Names Starzl Chief
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.