Personality Test: Museum CEO Andy Masich

By Tribune-Review, The | Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, January 28, 2009 | Go to article overview

Personality Test: Museum CEO Andy Masich


Tribune-Review, The, Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review


Once you meet Andy Masich, president and chief executive officer of the Senator John Heinz History Center in the Strip District, you never forget his contagious smile and his zest for life. He's the kind of guy who doesn't consider his job work.

Masich, 53, serves on the American Association of Museums' Accreditation Commission. His lively lectures, on subjects ranging from the Civil War to American Indians, have entertained and educated audiences from coast to coast. With Pittsburgh 250, Masich and his team worked closely with regional planners on joint awareness initiatives and developed and opened a timeless exhibit about Pittsburgh's innovations in November.

Masich also co-authored the book "Dan Rooney: My 75 Years With the Pittsburgh Steelers and the NFL," a New York Times best-seller. He serves on the board of Visit Pittsburgh and the Greater Pittsburgh Council of the Boy Scouts of America, and is a member of the Riverlife Task Force. He also is a vice chairman of the Greater Pittsburgh Arts Council (a network of arts and cultural institutions), vice president of Neighbors in the Strip -- an organization he helped to launch -- and vice president of the regional chapter of Phi Beta Kappa.

Before joining the History Center, Masich was vice president and acting president of the Colorado Historical Society in Denver.

The star who would play me in the movie version of my life and why:

Brad Pitt, because people will go and see the movie. Plus, I know he can be "uglied" up.

Childhood hero and why:

Stonewall Jackson.

In five years, I'd like to:

Be a grandfather.

My favorite thing about Pittsburgh:

The people -- "I love yinz!"

If the TV is on at 2 a.m., I'm watching:

"Get Smart" reruns, just to see Pittsburgher Barbara Feldon ("Agent 99").

Star I'd like to dance with on "Dancing With the Stars":

Jennifer Beals from "Flashdance," because she's a Pittsburgh figure, historical and will make me look good. But we can't have a water scene -- my hair's too thin!

My quirkiest inherited trait:

My flying saucer whistle terrifies school children and animals.

My best bar sport:

A. Pool

B. Darts

C. Air hockey

D. Beer pong

Darts. I haven't seriously injured anyone in weeks.

My favorite sandwich, plus fixings:

Primanti's capicola with the works (fries, coleslaw, etc.).

One word my mother would use to describe me:

She could never be confined to only one word -- "He's my son ... and my moon and stars."

Celebrity crush:

Viggo Mortensen -- my daughter Molly says I have a "man crush" on him.

The oldest thing in my refrigerator is:

Dried scorpion from Arizona.

My required snack in a movie theater is:

McDonald's hamburger, smuggled in my coat pocket.

When I was 10, I wanted to be:

Stonewall Jackson.

Vegetable I won't eat:

Okra -- life's too short.

I'm deathly afraid of:

Dying without having accomplished something great.

If I were auditioning for "American Idol," my song would be:

"Love Me Tender."

The first band I saw in concert:

Buck Owens and the Buckaroos.

TV marathon I could watch all day and why:

"Star Trek." Gene Roddenberry always said "Star Trek" is just "Wagon Train" in outer space. …

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