ARTS: Kubrick in Black & White ; A Fascinating New Book Reveals That, before Turning to Movies, Stanley Kubrick Was a Gifted Professional " If Self-Taught" Photographer, Writes Charlotte Cripps

By Cripps, Charlotte | The Independent (London, England), November 17, 2005 | Go to article overview
Save to active project

ARTS: Kubrick in Black & White ; A Fascinating New Book Reveals That, before Turning to Movies, Stanley Kubrick Was a Gifted Professional " If Self-Taught" Photographer, Writes Charlotte Cripps


Cripps, Charlotte, The Independent (London, England)


How can it be that hundreds of photographs by the great film director Stanley Kubrick have remained buried in dusty archives until now? Long before Kubrick (1928-1999) made his films, he was actually a staff photographer for the New York-based Look magazine. And while doing his job, snapping daily life and celebrities, he was already developing the cinematic style that would later inform his films.

These early photographs by Kubrick " only about 20 per cent of a total of 12,000 negatives were published in Look " were all taken from 1945- 1950. But had it not been for Rainer Crone, Professor of 20th-Century Art and Media at Ludwig-Maximilian University, Munich, painstakingly unearthing and sifting through all the negatives to produce Stanley Kubrick: Drama & Shadows, this side of the film director may have stayed in the shadows.

Kubrick was given a Graflex camera by his father on his 13th birthday, and at 17 he was sent on photographic assignments for Look. His photographs, whether of people on the subway, the boxer Rocky Graziano, the socialite Betsy von Frstenberg, or a Portuguese fishing village, go beyond photojournalism 'to reach an almost theatrical quality', writes Crone. It was in 1988 that Crone first wrote a letter to Kubrick to ask him where all his photographs were. He had already bought all of the back issues of Look, where Kubrick's photographs, Crone felt, were 'never judged for their unique visionary quality'.

'Kubrick phoned me back,' says Crone.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited article

ARTS: Kubrick in Black & White ; A Fascinating New Book Reveals That, before Turning to Movies, Stanley Kubrick Was a Gifted Professional " If Self-Taught" Photographer, Writes Charlotte Cripps
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?