Visual Culture Art Depicts Never-Ending Journey

By Kroeger, Judy | Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, February 15, 2009 | Go to article overview

Visual Culture Art Depicts Never-Ending Journey


Kroeger, Judy, Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review


Beverly DeMotte has taught art at Uniontown Area High School for 33 years while still pursuing her own projects.

She is February's artist of the month in the Fayette County Law Library, located in the Fayette County Courthouse.

Assistant Librarian Barbara Pasqua invited DeMotte to exhibit her work in a glass display case just inside the entrance. Viewers have to get close to the 11 postcard-sized pieces that compose "Journey of Peace," the installation's name.

"We thought this was wonderful, to display artworks every month," Pasqua said.

The pieces are Visual Culture Art, a post-modern movement that reflects contemporary concerns, DeMotte said. The format involves taking "snippets of popular culture -- images and words -- it's art that's made from everyday experiences. Welcome to my never-ending journey of peace. Politics, religion, the environment, racism, literature, sports, philosophy are among my concerns. I'm all about a peaceful journey."

DeMotte paints the background of each piece with acrylics, then adds words and images.

"When I'm cutting out the materials, I have all sorts of words," she said. It's like making up the rules of the game as I go along."

The seventh piece in the series is called "Obama's Charge to the Children."

The president is featured, looking at the silhouette of a young man. The text reads, "Right the wrongs you see and work to give others the chances you've had."

"I wanted to integrate the quote with Obama looking at a reflection of himself as a young man," DeMotte said.

Since completing the works on display, DeMotte has continued with further pieces and plans on preparing a circular format compelling viewers to walk around to view the pieces. She does not know how many will constitute her "never-ending journey of peace," and plans to display the works at the Uniontown Art Club's summer show at Touchstone Center for Crafts in Farmington.

This is DeMotte's first foray into Visual Culture Art. …

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