Attorney Advocated Ecumenism, Social Justice

By Vondas, Jerry | Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, March 12, 2009 | Go to article overview

Attorney Advocated Ecumenism, Social Justice


Vondas, Jerry, Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review


For attorney Jerry Earley, being a devout Roman Catholic meant more than just going to church on Sunday.

In 1986, Catholic Charities of the Diocese of Pittsburgh awarded him its Caritas Award for his commitment to helping those in need and for his advocacy for social justice.

Jerome A. Earley of Mt. Lebanon, a retired vice president for corporate development with Rockwell International, died on Sunday, March 8, 2009, in the Covenant of South Hills in Mt. Lebanon. He was 85.

Mr. Earley also was admired for his ecumenism. He was a director of the United Methodist Services for the Aging and the Asbury Heights Foundation

His son, Daniel Earley of Mt. Lebanon, said his father seldom talked about his accomplishments.

"Dad was really humble. We didn't know until he was awarded the Caritas Award that he was the recipient.

"And on numerous occasions during the time I was growing up, Dad would explain to me that accepting the rights of others was part of being a Catholic.

"He also voiced his feelings that segregation was wrong," his son said.

Born in Emsworth and raised in Emsworth and Ben Avon, Mr. Earley was one of five children in the family of Vincent and Hilda Earley.

In 1941, after graduating from Ben Avon High School, Mr. Earley entered the Navy and flew both fighters and dive bombers.

Following his discharge in 1945, Mr. Earley received his undergraduate degree in business and his law degree from the University of Pittsburgh. …

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