Pennsylvania Lawmakers Have History of Criminal Prosecution

By Tribune-Review, The | Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, March 17, 2009 | Go to article overview

Pennsylvania Lawmakers Have History of Criminal Prosecution


Tribune-Review, The, Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review


During the past decade, Pennsylvania lawmakers have faced criminal prosecution on charges ranging from entertaining underage prostitutes and charging it to the state, to extorting trips to Disney World.

Lawmakers and former lawmakers who have faced legal problems:

Vincent Fumo, D-Philadelphia, convicted Monday of 137 counts of public corruption. Senator, 1978-2008.

Michael Veon, D-Beaver Falls. Charged in July with 59 counts of criminal conspiracy, theft and conflict of interest in connection with an ongoing investigation into use of state resources for political gain. Representative, 1985-2006.

Sean Ramaley, D-Economy. Charged in July with six counts of criminal conspiracy, theft and conflict of interest in connection with an ongoing investigation into use of state resources for political gain. Representative, 2005-08.

Frank LaGrotta, D-Ellwood City. Sentenced in February 2008 to six months' house arrest for pleading guilty to two felony conflict-of- interest counts for hiring family members for no-show state jobs. Representative, 1986-2006.

Jeffrey Habay, R-Shaler. Pleaded no contest in April to multiple ethics violations for using staff to do political work and for triggering an anthrax scare by sending white powder through the mail. Served 5 months in Allegheny County Jail; released in December. …

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Pennsylvania Lawmakers Have History of Criminal Prosecution
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