Caucasus Region Security

By Sargsyan, Serzh | Hampton Roads International Security Quarterly, April 1, 2009 | Go to article overview

Caucasus Region Security


Sargsyan, Serzh, Hampton Roads International Security Quarterly


It gives me profound pleasure to address this prestigious forum the Munich Security Conference. I will outline Armenia's perspective on the hot topics of South Caucasus. I emphasize that it will be Armenia's vision, since I am confident that there are also other perspectives in the region. A region, which in the last two decades has re-emerged in the priority lists of states, international organizations, analysts, and leading media. The South Caucasus, which for over 70 years was isolated from the major international developments as a separate factor, now re-gains its international importance as a transportation corridor, as a major root for export and transit of the energy resources, a platform for the establishment of democracy, as well as an area in the process of assessing its own role, meaning and mission in the contemporary world. Today, despite the existing differences and controversies, countries of the South Caucasus, are much more assertive in assessing their role and potential capacity to impact international developments. Armenia is one of those countries. And it believes in values of freedom, peace, and cooperation. We truly believe that only regional cooperation and dialogue can help materialize our common vision for empowerment of a peaceful and stable region. And that is exactly what we aim our efforts and ambitions at. Leaders from our region often make statements about their passion for peace, cooperation and stability. All that is possible if in our region we achieve combination, rather than confrontation of interests of all those states and organizations, which have special and very obvious role in the South Caucasus. If we look back at our history, it would be obvious that superpowers and empires historically had an ambition to establish their hegemony over this part of the world. It is also true today. Contemporary South Caucasus is a model of the multi- polarity of the world. It is one of the regions, where there are seemingly unyielding dividing lines, where internationally recognized political map is very different from the real one, where stability is extremely vulnerable, and the re-establishment of peace requires a joint and concentrated titanic efforts. We way too often speak about "what will happen" and "how will something develop" or "how to manage" questions, while in reality, I believe, it is correct to speak also about what lessons have we all learned from last years' developments, from the bloody military events of the previous year, and from the global financial-ecnomic crisis? We the countries of the region, superpowers and all those players, who have interests in our region, shall learn at least from our own mistakes what shall not be done. Year 2008 has left us lessons we have to learn. And let me turn to three of those lessons: First of all, I believe that the August events have made it clear for everyone how tense the situation in the Caucasus actually is, how serious the challenges and threats there are. This was a reminder to all those involved that each careless word, each uncalculated step are potent with unpredictable consequences and that the arms race, substantial expansion of the military budget, militaristic rhetoric charge the atmosphere, which inescapably brings to provocations, actions and such situations, which, as it usually has been happening, can get out of control of those who are responsible for creating such atmosphere. It is a primer truth, that threats to use force challenge peace, and attempts against peace shall not go unnoticed. Second, we have talked extensively about unacceptability of drawing new dividing lines. We should always remind ourselves, that the Cold War is over, and the political logic and modus operandi of that big controversy shall not survive. The world has witnessed the dangers of the world divided by power polar systems and their controversies. We have witnessed in our lifetime the consequences of regional divides. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Caucasus Region Security
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.