Pittsburgh's Up-and-Coming Fashion Designers Strut Their Stuff in Threads Fashion Show

By Harrop, JoAnne Klimovich | Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, May 1, 2009 | Go to article overview

Pittsburgh's Up-and-Coming Fashion Designers Strut Their Stuff in Threads Fashion Show


Harrop, JoAnne Klimovich, Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review


You don't have to go to New York to see the hottest looks from up- and-coming clothing designers. Pittsburgh has its own group of fashion-forward creative types.

"People might think Pittsburgh is not very fashionable, but I say Pittsburgh is fashionable," says designer Ali Pace of the North Side, owner of Bombshell Boutique with her mother Annette Pace. "That way of thinking has just stuck with Pittsburgh, but it is OK to be the underdog, because Pittsburgh likes being the underdog. That way, we can surprise some people who will see a different side of Pittsburgh."

Catch a glimpse of the city's more fashionable side Thursday. Pace and other young designers will showcase their lines at the second annual Threads Fashion Show at Diesel Club Lounge in the South Side. The purpose of the event is to promote up-and-coming local designers and retailers. This year's theme is spring, fashion, music and culture. Their clothing, which encompasses custom-made dresses, tutus and vibrant T-shirts, will be available for sale that evening.

Each designer has 15 minutes to do whatever he or she wishes. You might see models in conjunction with a music video. Some will strike a pose while a disc jockey spins tunes. Others will perform dance steps.

"It is pretty neat that they will give us our own time per designer to do what we want," says Brittney Thieroff of Avalon, owner of Babylove. "That is complete creative freedom."

This is Thieroff's first time doing this show. Her plan is to have models dancing and use a music video of "Boys Want to be Her" by Peaches, a popular European singer.

Thieroff's line is about getting dressed up and going out.

"It is fun and very in-your-face," she says. "I use a lot of metallics and a lot of bling. My line is not very understated. I find designing fascinating. I do custom designs and create pieces you aren't going to see anywhere else. I like to stir things up and get people excited about fashion, because we have a lot of talented designers right here in Pittsburgh. …

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