OKC Medical Briefs: February 20, 2002

By Carter, Ray | THE JOURNAL RECORD, February 2, 2002 | Go to article overview

OKC Medical Briefs: February 20, 2002


Carter, Ray, THE JOURNAL RECORD


Centrex Inc. has announced patent filings in both U.S. and foreign jurisdictions for the nucleic acid sequence detection technology that forms the core of its planned multi-channel biopathogen device.

The patents for this platform technology were filed through Los Alamos National Laboratory and the University of California. The foreign filings were for the European Union and Japan.

Tulsa-based Centrex owns the exclusive U.S. license to develop, manufacture, and market a system for detecting microbial contamination due to E. coli bacteria, developed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory by Alonso Castro. The detection system, currently in development at Los Alamos, is designed to be adaptable and can be tailored to detect a variety of bacterial or viral organisms in real time. Recently, Centrex proposed to the Los Alamos National Laboratory that the application of the technology be expanded to detect a variety of potentially lethal biowarfare or bioterrorism agents.

Once a funds-in agreement has been executed between Centrex and the laboratory, work can begin on the proposed multi-channel prototype. The organisms being considered for detection by the device include all those named in the biological warfare threat list published by the Defense Intelligence Agency, in addition to several other potential biowarfare agents.

The proposed device is a simultaneous multi-channel detection system that is compact, fully automated and capable of monitoring the presence of biological agents in food, air and water.

Centrex is a development-stage company organized in 1998 to identify and commercialize proprietary systems for the detection of biological contaminants in food, air and water.

Nursing homes

A Denver-based company that compared nursing home inspection and complaint reports for metropolitan areas in the United States over the last four years has ranked Oklahoma City among the best metro areas in the nation.

The Healthgrades.com analysis rated Nashville, Tenn., as the best in the nation, followed by Baton Rouge, La.; Jacksonville, Fla.; Oklahoma City; and Los Angeles, Calif.

The cities were rated by the high percentage of facilities showing no actual harm violations from health or complaint surveys.

Compliance Resource Group

The Compliance Resource Group, a provider of employment-related substance abuse testing and management services, will open a drug and alcohol testing facility, CRG Laboratories on March 4 in Oklahoma City.

The grand opening celebration will take place onsite at the Parkway Office Building, 1300 S. Meridian Ave., Ste. 303, from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. March 1.

Ombudsman Program

The Ombudsman Program is seeking volunteers to help protect the care of those in long-term care facilities. Those interested can learn more at a public information workshop, scheduled from 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. March 4 and 5 at the Canadian County Vo-Tech, three miles east of El Reno.

The workshop is free. For more information, call Anna States at 942-8500, Ext. 141.

Contact Crisis Helpline

Contact Crisis Helpline's board of directors has elected officers and six new members who will comprise the Class of 2004. …

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OKC Medical Briefs: February 20, 2002
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