Officials Break Ground on Centennial Memorial Plaza

THE JOURNAL RECORD, June 13, 2002 | Go to article overview
Save to active project

Officials Break Ground on Centennial Memorial Plaza


A $3.6 million plaza project will bring color and history to the Capitol's south steps, officials said Wednesday at a dedication ceremony.

The ceremony came a few days after the topping of the new Capitol dome with The Guardian, a huge bronze statue of an American Indian that was designed by state Sen. Kelly Haney, D-Seminole.

Construction began immediately on the Centennial Memorial Plaza, which will feature red, pink and black granite, replacing a concrete area. The work is scheduled to be finished by Nov. 1.

"The construction will be completed just in time for Oklahoma's 95th anniversary of statehood and the dedication of the state Capitol dome, both taking place on November 16 of this year," said J. Blake Wade, executive director of the Oklahoma Centennial Commission.

The plaza will feature 28 granite rosettes designed after the state seal. They will commemorate 28 historical events in Oklahoma, such as the Land Run of 1889, statehood in 1907 and the moving of the Capitol from Guthrie to Oklahoma City in 1910. Federal highway beautification funds are being used to build the plaza.

"It is superb," Gov. Frank Keating said.

Visitors to the Capitol will be greeted by an area rich in color and history instead of drab, gray concrete, he said.

The plaza is one of almost 200 projects of the Centennial Commission, which is planning for the state's 100th birthday in 2007. Paul Meyer, state architect, designed the plaza, which will be built by Haskell Lemon Construction of Oklahoma City. The statues now in the plaza area will remain and will be surrounded by granite benches.

Meyer said the Washington Tree on the west side of the plaza area will be protected during construction. Seeds from the original tree in Mount Vernon were brought to Oklahoma and planted at the Capitol in 1930.

Besides the plaza remodeling, an additional $1.5 million in state and federal funds are being spent to make Americans with Disabilities Act compliance modifications at the Capitol.

Choosing software

EDS, which operates the Oklahoma Health Care Authority's Medicaid program, has bought a predictive fraud and abuse detection system from HNC Software, a provider of high-end analytics and decision management software.

"For years, HNC Payment Optimizer has been instrumental in helping EDS identify millions of dollars worth of fraudulent claims for our clients," said Frank Abramcheck, president of EDS' Administrative Process Management Delivery Group. "The technology detects patterns that other methods miss, enabling us to find new fraud schemes faster and refer cases with the highest likelihood of recovery."

More than 400,000 Oklahoma residents receive services from about 22,000 health care providers who participate in the state's Medicaid program.

The preferred provider

Williams Communications Group has signed a streaming media services agreement with TheGolfChannel.com , the leading online provider of golf news, instruction, information and services and a division of The Golf Channel. Under the terms of the agreement, Williams Communications will be TheGolfChannel.com's preferred provider for streaming golf-related audio and video content.

Through its various streaming media offerings, Tulsa-based Williams Communications moves more than 63 million audio and video streams over its network on a monthly basis.

Now open in Tulsa

Fiserv has opened a check-processing center in Tulsa, as well as one in Richmond, Va. Ken Acheson, president of the Fiserv Check Processing Division,

said the new centers help to meet a growing need for image-based check processing.

"Fiserv has committed to a national image strategy that will provide access to imaging services for all our clients. Tulsa and Richmond are two new areas where our account processing clients, in addition to other area banks, are looking for an image solution for their check processing," Acheson said.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited article

Officials Break Ground on Centennial Memorial Plaza
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?