Whipped Ricotta Dip Needs Only Four Ingredients

By Rosbottom, Betty | Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, September 2, 2009 | Go to article overview

Whipped Ricotta Dip Needs Only Four Ingredients


Rosbottom, Betty, Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review


What's more popular as an appetizer than a dip? Whether it's a salsa with crispy chips, a silky blue cheese melange with spicy chicken wings, or a simple herbed mayonnaise-and-sour cream mix surrounded by crudites, dips are enduring crowd-pleasers.

The dip featured here is uncomplicated and quick to assemble. It calls for only four ingredients: a premium ricotta, grated Parmigiano-Reggiano, fresh-chopped thyme and a touch of salt. The toasted baguette slices that accompany it are just as effortless. They are brushed with olive oil, toasted in the oven and then rubbed with a cut garlic clove.

To make the dip, ricotta cheese is whipped, using an electric mixer, for a few seconds until it is smooth and creamy, then the Parmigiano-Reggiano is added. Finally, fresh-snipped thyme and salt are stirred in. Whipping the ricotta produces a lovely texture, while the salty Parmigiano-Reggiano and the assertive thyme provide perfect flavor boosts for this fairly neutral cheese. For serving, spoon the ricotta into a bowl, garnish with the golden baguette croutons, and add some red or yellow cherry tomatoes for a jolt of color. Voila! A chic new dip to enjoy with your friends.

Whipped Ricotta Dip with Garlic-Rubbed Toasts

1 1/2 cups premium ricotta (see Note)

1/2 cup finely grated parmesan cheese, preferably Parmigiano- Reggiano

1 1/2 tablespoons freshly chopped thyme, plus a few sprigs for garnish

3/8 teaspoon kosher salt, plus more if needed

For the Garlic-Rubbed Toasts:

24 baguette slices, cut about 3/8 inch thick

Olive oil for brushing the bread slices

2 medium-size cloves garlic, peeled and halved lengthwise

2 cups cherry or grape tomatoes (red or yellow or a combination of both), for garnish

To prepare the dip: Place the ricotta in a mixing bowl and, using an electric mixer, beat on medium speed until smooth, for about 30 seconds. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Whipped Ricotta Dip Needs Only Four Ingredients
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.