Teachers to Strike South Butler Schools

By Rittmeyer, Brian C | Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, September 2, 2009 | Go to article overview

Teachers to Strike South Butler Schools


Rittmeyer, Brian C, Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review


Starting Monday, all but about 100 students will have the day off -- and quite possibly the next 11 school days, too.

Teachers in the South Butler County School District are on the eve of starting their second strike since their last contract expired in June 2008. A strike lasted 18 days last fall.

If it goes the distance, this fall's strike could last for 12 days, district and union officials said.

In that case, students won't return to school until Oct. 7.

The state Department of Education will issue its own determination on when teachers will be required to return to work so that students can get 180 days of instruction by June 15.

The 100 students who will continue going to school are juniors and seniors who attend the half-day program at the Butler County Area Vocational-Technical School, South Butler Superintendent Frank Prazenica said.

During the strike, transportation will be provided for students enrolled in non-public schools, special education schools outside the district and vocational and alternative programs.

The district will postpone many activities until after the strike.

However, interscholastic athletic events and practices are expected to continue.

"We're going to try to continue everything we can," Prazenica said. "There's a lot of unknowns here right now. …

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