Third Degree Redesigns Its Own Image

By Janice Francis-Smith The Journal Record | THE JOURNAL RECORD, November 4, 2002 | Go to article overview

Third Degree Redesigns Its Own Image


Janice Francis-Smith The Journal Record, THE JOURNAL RECORD


Third Degree Advertising and Communications recently directed the agency's creative talents toward redesigning its own image and office space.

"We are good at practicing what we preach to our clients," said President and CEO Roy Page. "We underwent the same type of brand analysis that we apply to our clients and discovered that the core value of our company centers on fresh ideas, hot creative talent and friendly service that produces the right results for our clients.

"Armed with this information, we employed Studio Architecture to help us illustrate our brand image in the redesign of our office space," Page said.

Located on the second floor of the 1919 Mercantile Building in Bricktown, Third Degree's offices have been completely redone to reflect the agency's "fresh, hot and friendly" attitude.

"Sterile" is how Page described the offices before the redesign - - concrete floor, brick walls. "It didn't have the story our current space has."

Third Degree's staff all contributed their individual ideas for the redesign, Page said.

"[Chief Operating Officer] Kelly Mateer did an outstanding job of getting everyone's input," he said. "The design reflects the agency as a person." Page said you can see the results in the employees' attitude, work product, and excitement. "I think people work better in an environment they feel good in."

Creative Director Paul Corrigan agreed. "I think it has brought us all together," Corrigan said, noting the open, shared spaces. There are no doors, hallways or "corner offices," complementing the agency's business philosophy: an open environment promoting communication and teamwork. Wood and metal dividers placed at the center of the office create two meeting areas the staff refer to as "War Room" and "Diner. …

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