Small Pa. Airports Get Big Bite of Funding from FAA's Federal Grant Program

By Fontaine, Tom | Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, October 18, 2009 | Go to article overview

Small Pa. Airports Get Big Bite of Funding from FAA's Federal Grant Program


Fontaine, Tom, Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review


Westmoreland County's Rostraver Airport doesn't offer commercial flights, but over the past five years it received more than $2.1 million from a federal program funded largely through fees on airline tickets, a study shows.

"Airports like this can be the most desolate places in the world on a day like this," said Glen Ramsey, 75, of St. Petersburg, Fla., waiting for rain to pass Friday morning so he and a friend could fly home in a 1969 Piper Cherokee single-engine plane.

Rostraver's airfield was otherwise empty. For two hours, airport operations consisted of an employee cutting grass and food being served in the airport's Eagle's Landing Restaurant -- and even that was slow.

"I've had two tables all morning," a waitress said.

Since 2005, Rostraver, which averages 115 takeoffs and landings a day, received more than $2.1 million through the Federal Aviation Administration's Airport Improvement Program, according to a study by Subsidyscope, an initiative of Pew Charitable Trusts. That money helped pay for airfield paving, lighting, snow-removal equipment and a project to add space beyond its runway to meet federal safety guidelines.

That's a small cut of the $563.6 million the federal grant program has pumped into Pennsylvania aviation over the past five years, including $476.2 million directly to 21 airports across the state, the study showed. Other money went toward studies, surveys and a state grant program.

Not surprisingly, the state's busiest commercial airports received much of the money. Philadelphia International received $139.1 million, or almost a quarter of all money doled out, and Pittsburgh International got $66.8 million. Pittsburgh's total included $9.8 million in American Recovery and Investment Act money for runway improvements, the largest stimulus check for aviation in Pennsylvania, the study showed.

But 10 of the airports that cashed in, receiving a combined $68.6 million since 2005, averaged fewer than 20 commercial or charter passengers a day. Three of those airports -- Rostraver (0 passengers), Quakertown (0) and Allentown Queen City (11) -- had fewer than 20 passengers during the entire five-year span.

Between 2005 and 2008, the state's airports received an average of $4.29 in grant money for every passenger. The national average, according to Subsidyscope research, was $3.85 per passenger.

David Castelveter, a spokesman for the Air Transport Association, a trade group for the major airlines, said the grant program is disproportionately funded.

Small general-aviation airports such as Rostraver supply about 3 percent of the money to the Airport and Airway Trust Fund, which keeps the $3. …

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Small Pa. Airports Get Big Bite of Funding from FAA's Federal Grant Program
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