Lessening the Load: Japanese Training System Inspires University of Oklahoma Exercise Professor's Research

By Wilkerson, April | THE JOURNAL RECORD, December 16, 2009 | Go to article overview

Lessening the Load: Japanese Training System Inspires University of Oklahoma Exercise Professor's Research


Wilkerson, April, THE JOURNAL RECORD


A University of Oklahoma exercise science professor's drive to help older populations has intersected with a Japanese man's business interests.

The result: ongoing research with a training system that could play a role in rehabilitation, physical therapy and bone health.

And it all began as something of a fluke.

A few years ago, when Dr. Michael Bemben took his first sabbatical since arriving at OU, he opted to study at Tokyo Metropolitan University and focus on a piece of ultrasound equipment that he already had in his lab at home. But he encountered a professor and a training system that captured his attention instead.

The KAATSU-Master Training System is a piece of equipment that features blood pressure-like cuffs inflated on the thighs or arms of a person while lifting weights. The traditional approach to lifting weights to build muscle has been to lift at 80 percent of a person's strength. But the KAATSU system, by restricting blood flow to its user, drops that load to 20 percent. Bemben's goal is to test its efficacy and safety in the United States, especially as it pertains to older generations.

"In Japan, this system has been common and has been used in thousands of training centers for years," Bemben said. "But it never made its way outside the country until recently."

Bemben's lab at OU is one of only four outside of Japan that have begun testing the KAATSU system, which roughly translates to vascular restriction in English, he said. The American work is taking place through a partnership with the American College of Sports Medicine and the Sato Sports Plaza of Japan.

Japanese studies have shown the system to be effective and safe, Bemben said, and the American research is building on that. His excitement for the system is that it could make weightlifting possible for those who stand to benefit the most but are not able to do it.

"If someone can't lift heavy loads because of joint problems, arthritis or a knee or hip replacement, they can use this and still get the benefit of exercise," Bemben said. "It's still a very intense exercise; you're still fatiguing the muscle, but the equipment allows you to train at 20 percent."

When a person puts on the KAATSU cuffs - either high on the thighs or arms - they first acclimate to the pressure before lifting weights. The pressure begins at 40 to 60 millimeters of mercury, with a target of 180 millimeters, Bemben said. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Lessening the Load: Japanese Training System Inspires University of Oklahoma Exercise Professor's Research
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.