New President of SBC Oklahoma Believes Over-Regulation in Telecom Industry Hinders Economy

By Francis-Smith, Janice | THE JOURNAL RECORD, December 8, 2003 | Go to article overview
Save to active project

New President of SBC Oklahoma Believes Over-Regulation in Telecom Industry Hinders Economy


Francis-Smith, Janice, THE JOURNAL RECORD


The telecommunications industry has outgrown federal regulations imposed upon it during the last century, says the new president of SBC Oklahoma. Donald Cain took over as president of SBC Oklahoma on Oct. 20. Upon his appointment, Cain said one of his main goals is to provide Oklahomans with the most advanced technology and to help make the state an economic draw for high-tech companies.

A native of the Texas Panhandle city of Pampa, Cain earned a bachelor's degree from McMurry University in Abilene, Texas, in 1976, and taught history and psychology at Pampa High School and the Dallas Academy before joining SBC.

Cain has been with SBC for 24 years, beginning in 1979 in the company's customer-focused network services organization and moving on to several positions dealing with customer service, regulatory and external affairs. Cain headed the legislative and regulatory team in South Africa, representing SBC's interest in Telkom South Africa, from 1997 to 2000.

Prior to his present position as president of SBC Oklahoma, Cain served more than three years as SBC's managing director of federal regulatory policy in Washington, D.C.

According to Cain, many of the regulations that were originally designed to help the consumer now do the consumer more harm than good. Over-regulation discourages investment in research and development, which in turn cripples the entire economy, he said.

Many of the rules that currently govern the telecommunications industry went into effect in the early 1980s, noted Cain. (SBC controlled) 83 percent of the access lines in the state, he said. Today, with the advent of cellular phones, e-mail and other communications options, SBC possesses less than 40 percent of the market.

Regulation is supposed to substitute for competition in a monopoly market, said Cain. Well, the competition is here. It's time to let the market work.

Fears that deregulation would cause prices to skyrocket have been proved unfounded in the past, noted Cain. For instance, the cost of high-speed DSL Internet access has become less expensive since broadband services have been deregulated.

But SBC is still saddled with a number of outdated regulations, Cain said. As the incumbent carrier, we continue to get regulated as if it's still the 1980s, said Cain. We need the ability to have the same freedom our competitors do.

Cain pointed to the railroad industry as an example.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited article

New President of SBC Oklahoma Believes Over-Regulation in Telecom Industry Hinders Economy
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?