Pittsburgh Medical Staff, Rendell, Altmire, Doctors on Plane to Haiti

By Fabregas, Luis | Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, January 18, 2010 | Go to article overview

Pittsburgh Medical Staff, Rendell, Altmire, Doctors on Plane to Haiti


Fabregas, Luis, Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review


Gov. Ed Rendell and U.S. Rep. Jason Altmire today joined a team of doctors and others on a charter plane to Haiti that left Pittsburgh about noon and could bring back nearly half the children in an orphanage run by two Ben Avon sisters.

Rendell, Altmire and other Pennsylvania lawmakers worked over the weekend to secure the children's departure. The plane had been expected to leave at 9 a.m. but was delayed several hours when it finally left Pittsburgh International Airport, according to several people with knowledge of the trip.

The mission is expected to bring to Pittsburgh 61 of 150 children at the BRESMA orphanage in Port-au-Prince, said Gary Tuma, a Rendell spokesman. The plane landed in Miami about 3 p.m., Tuma said. It is expected to return to Pittsburgh about midnight.

Last week's 7.0-magnitude earthquake mostly destroyed the orphanage. Jamie and Ali McMutrie of Ben Avon, who have run part of the orphanage since 2007, expressed fears for their safety and well- being and told friends and relatives they are short on supplies such as food and water.

Larry Smar, a spokesman for U.S. Sen. Bob Casey, said today the orphanage received food, water and medical supplies but "there remains a need to provide security and more resources" for BRESMA and other orphanages in the capital. Smar said Casey was not on the plane.

Tuma said 41 of the 61 children coming to Pittsburgh are in various stages of the adoption process. They will be evaluated at Children's Hospital in Lawrenceville, he said.

"They don't know what they're going to find once they get down there," Tuma said. "We're hoping for a quick turnaround."

The mission was the culmination of efforts by lawmakers and several small groups trying to figure out a way to help the earthquake-ravaged nation. It wasn't clear how many people were on the plane but Tuma said the team included several doctors and nurses from the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, West Penn Allegheny Health System and the Pittsburgh Mercy Health System.

The group did not include former federal prosecutor Mary Beth Buchanan, who had been working toward the same goal.

"I had little prior knowledge of the attempted air rescue mission that departed from Pittsburgh today, though I have since been advised that some of the resources aboard the flight were collected through the efforts of myself and others," Buchanan said in a statement. "Now that it is underway I am hopeful for the best, and continue to pray for the safety of young Jamie and Ali, this group of Haitian orphans and all of the people suffering in Haiti.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Pittsburgh Medical Staff, Rendell, Altmire, Doctors on Plane to Haiti
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.