OU Professor Documents Under-Representation of Female, Minority Faculty

By Centrella, Heidi R. | THE JOURNAL RECORD, July 2, 2004 | Go to article overview

OU Professor Documents Under-Representation of Female, Minority Faculty


Centrella, Heidi R., THE JOURNAL RECORD


A professor at the University of Oklahoma has compiled data that has piqued curiosities for some time, but has never before been confirmed. Said data reflects the under-representation of female and minority faculty members at top research universities.

Donna Nelson, associate professor of chemistry, conducted a national survey of department chairs at the top 50 departments in each of 14 science and engineering disciplines, as ranked by the National Science Foundation. The information gathered included demographic data on tenure and tenure-track faculty, desegregated by gender, race and rank - information never before compiled.

Nelson, who has been a professor of chemistry for 20 years, said because she had worked in chemistry her entire life, she knew firsthand what the environment was like.

And it's horrible, she said. We really are behind the rest of the world in science, and this is extremely important right now because women and minorities both are dropping out of science nationally. And all of these organizations say that they're investigating why, but they really don't want to know why because it's really sort of ugly.

Nelson's research shows that while there are fewer women and minorities in these positions, and women hold the lowest academic rank, their doctorate attainment is quite high.

Anytime you have this huge PhD attainment, there's this huge hiring pool, she said. But then very few women are actually in those positions. That tells you there's a problem.

Furthermore, her research shows that in the top 50 computer science departments, there are no black, Hispanic or Native American tenured or tenure-track women faculty.

Nelson said she faced obstacles and retaliation, and also received some pressure not to report the data from within the American Chemical Society, but this did not keep her from publishing the information. Because of this, Nelson received last week the National Woman of Courage award from the National Organization for Women.

According to her research, in chemistry, math and some other disciplines last year, more than half of the bachelor's degrees were received nationally by young women. Yet in math, the faculty is only 8.9 percent female.

So you have more than half of the degrees going to young women, but less than 10 percent of the faculty is women, she said. These young women are in there with very few role models, very few female mentors.

Nelson will speak Thursday on Capitol Hill at the invitation of U.S. Sens. Ron Wyden, D-Ore., and Barbara Boxer, D-Calif., to address this issue and that of Title 9, a law that guarantees in educational institutions women will receive equal treatment to men. Wyden requested the Government Accounting Organization to study the larger agencies, including the NSF and National Institutes of Health, to see if this law was being implemented, or, doing what it's supposed to do.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

OU Professor Documents Under-Representation of Female, Minority Faculty
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.